btrachtenberg100

  • I disagree that there is no emotional minipulation in the film. You said yourself that the music is overtly emotional and the part of the pound really played with my heartstrings. What the film is not doing is minipulating our thoughts, rather it presents the ideas of aging and loss of dignity in an emotional […]

  • The interesting thing i found about Mussolini, was that he was a huge film fan and would preview all the films in italy. The even more intriguing thing was his approach to the implementation of cinema as a poltical tool. While it’s true that he didnt use it to the forceful extreme that Hitler did, […]

  • Everyone remarks how the close up reveals all the details in a face, the “silent soliloquy”, that allows us to interpret the actors thoughts and emotions. I think close-ups of faces that are devoid of emotion might be equally as powerful as the dramatic wrinkles that these authors have described. In a horror film, for […]

  • An actor doesnt always have to be believable. It depends on the role and the intentionality of the director. In “Lost Highway” the actors perfomances are very hollow and unbelieveable, but this disconnection is an essential element to understanding the film. Stanley Kubrick is known for directing stars to be very cold and unemotional. This […]

  • Cinema has developed its own discourse, allowing native audiences to process cues unconsciously and follow a story. A visual language, film’s dialect differs depending on the country. Grammatical rules set up by the Hollywood system have given western movies a distinct stylistic flavor. The tone of which as Robert Stam suggests carries nationalistic tendencies reflecting […]

  • A movie can be good if the material is bad. That is if you believe what Jean Renoir says regarding the career of a director is making essentially one film. I feel that a more complicated the span of work reflects the more profound director as an artist who conceptualizes a deeper, more realized version […]

  • One cannot categorize film noir. To label it as a genre would demean its importance, for it is a pronounced style that revolutionized the way we watch film. It’s realist approach by injecting cinema with cynicism and powerful compositions. The lighting and extensive use of shadows reflects the deceitful nature of the characters in the […]

  • While the nature of the relation between shots reflects the objective understanding that evolved from juxtaposing pictographs. It’s a step forward in a sort of picto-linguistics that facilitates a narrative through a rubric of standards. The theory of the auteur reflects the humanity that the individual brings to the screen. Similar to this shared standard […]

  • I am first and foremost a supporter of the film auteur theory. I believe that a director leaves a unique imprint on the film he creates. Having seen Citizen Kane multiple times as well as Touch of Evil, I can make a distinct connection between the two pieces as works of the same artist. Wells […]

  • It takes a clever film such as “Lady Eve” to remind me of the striking differences between today’s risqué comedies and those of the glory days of cinema. I would go so far as to compare a comedy where constraints force the artist to find loopholes in what’s accepted to a low budget film. I […]

  • From a surrealists perspective, its true that film is the product of the collaboration of the conscious and dream realities. Being that art is the reflection of our innermost expressions, and most of those feelings are based off our everyday experiences, its not really surprising that people wont agree with your perspective. The fact that […]

  • The psychological implications of film are far greater than that of any other form of art. It goes without saying that our mind processes concepts in visual terms and associations. To remember a name of someone you just met, it may pay to create a mnemonic to create meaning from a name. Otherwise it will […]

  • thats Dario Argento. nice