Victoria Fontana

  • Megan discusses using Wikipedia as a “pathway to other, perhaps more reliable, resources. It’s important for teachers to illustrate proper usage for popular resources that are readily available to the world to avoid relying on utilizing them in “unproductive ways and can help you see sources as more than static products to plunk into your […]

  • Safaarah says, “If we do not help our students to develop this skill , they will remain lost and unable to successfully navigate a technologically-driven world.” Web 2.0 provides multitudes of sources and sites that contain truthful or biased information. A teacher doesn’t have the power to maintain what information is provided. But he does […]

  • As Dana mentioned, Canagarajah advocates for an educational environment that utilizes what students already know. There might be some benefit to accepting the Platonic belief that knowledge is “recollection.” In Perl’s essay, Tony recalled applied knowledge to the examined writing task based on recollection of personal experiences. His writing…[Read more]

  • Please ignore Canagarajah’s definition provided.

  • Guadalupe asks, “Are teachers willing to allow students to use their own variety of English written in academic work?” Some teachers may suggest that students should be able to commit to using only SWE in the classroom and use their native dialect at home or outside the classroom because they live in a society that […]

  • Victoria Fontana commented on the blog post Standards 9 years, 5 months ago

    I like John’s question regarding whether Brannon’s comments mean ” the end of a teacher’s freedom”. Today’s learning guidlenes and existing standardized exams do not provide hope for a positive future. They are backed by big industries with great power. But history suggests that all great empires fall (standardized essay prompt!). I wonder if the […]

  • I agree that students “should never write for purposes not grounded in real-world experiences,” as Kixmiller highlights. Technology is weaved into the fabric of the contemporary classroom because students need to learn in a way that is suited to the reality of their environment. Therefore, authentic writing prompts should too be welcome in every s…[Read more]

  • In The Problems of National Standards, Lil Brannon challenges Miles Myers idea that national standards will provide the opportunity to solve the literacy crisis in America. She feels that national standards create an oversimplification of and diversion from real problems that plague today’s students. The challenge is to not perpetuate the literacy crisis by oversimplifying ELA standards that […]

  • Practice makes perfect… this I agree with as well. Connors writes, “Students failed the Harvard examinations because they had never been asked to do much writing, not because they had failed to grasp their elementary lessons.” The students didn’t have the time to practice. If great lessons are not practiced, they may be easily forgotten. […]

  • Chris asks, “what is the place for teaching grammar?” Elbow might say that grammar has its place within the “language” that predominates the classroom, the “mother tongue. This would ensure safety in the classroom” and would allow for students to think freely instead of fearing and dreading writing. Language and dialect is deeply entrenched in […]

  • As you included in your synopsis about high-stakes writing, Elbow says, students “often struggle in nonproductive ways and produce terrible and tangled prose.” High-stakes writing administers added pressure and stress which can impede the natural cognitive mechanisms involved in critical thinking and thoughtful writing. High-stakes writing also d…[Read more]

  • It is crucial to, as you wrote, ” to keep from feeling disappointed or discouraged.” Beginning commentary with truthful positive responses that will lead into constructive criticism may allow students to recognize their and further utilize their strengths. This can also balance out the dooming effects of discovering weaknesses. It’s important to…[Read more]

  • Secondly, may we include any part of our revised literacy narrative?

  • The links to the articles are really helpful. I think I have a good idea of what to do from reading those articles and the advice above. However, since I couldn’t attend class last Monday (my apologies!!) I need to clarify a point. We’re asked to adopt a “balance of moving away from personal narrative” […]

  • Thank you, Chris!!! Was sick, but thankfully I’m getting better. See you Monday!

  • As a student who is not used to the process of submitting unedited drafts, there is that element of self-consciousness to consider – here’s is where a student may initially shut down. However, as Mishka wrote, “with consistency the process eventually becomes second nature.” I am a big fan of draft essays and revisions. As […]

  • Harris and Lamott would both agree this will allow for a student to clean up their content in a step-by-step process.

  • Harris and Lamott both agree that initially shifting away from structure allows a writer to gear up for the final process. Drafting or practicing recursive writing impels cognitive processes and promotes reflection and purpose. Patricia Bizzell might count on the inner-directed theorists to support this approach. These theorists would argue that…[Read more]

  • I’m also curious about the differences in teaching methods at each of these schools. I imagine that there are differences that can clearly be defined and recognized, and others that are so deeply entrenched in the system, they are too difficult to recognize and too convoluted to easily fix. Nevertheless, children need structure. The success […]

  • Formulaic writing is quick and painless, like Gabrielle Lusser Rico’s description of a “band-aid” but can only foster rudimentary knowledge of a subject. Rote memorization of a few facts about a topic or two can do the job. Supporting this limited use of knowledge omits a crucial creative process that allows a student to intellectually […]

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