Brett Doren

  • Brett Doren wrote a new post, Voyant, on the site Theory 3 months, 3 weeks ago

    My time with Voyant yielded some fascinating, if not seemingly obvious information.  Seeing as how a large portion of the novel is dedicated to horror, of a more industrial nature, I wanted to examine just want […]

  • The ASL point you make really makes me wonder a little bit about language in general. It seems that, at least with the sign for eat, there is a somewhat intuitive or instinctual aspect to the use of certain symbols. While this could be written off as a cultural thing, that can’t be said about that sign for eating as it mimics the act. So now…[Read more]

  • I think you draw a very interesting distinction with the example of the dog’s growl, and certainly that is not arbitrary, but one has to wonder if that instinctive meaning is learned or ingrained. I’m not sure, but I have seen a very small child who didn’t quite get that their dog didnt appreciate it’s tail being pulled and that the growl could…[Read more]

  • In Ferdinand De Saussere’s Nature of the Linguistic sign he discusses the “primordial” natures of signifiers and what they signify, as well as the “material”.  The implication I found to be most interesting of […]

    • Hmmm, I wonder if the part of Saussure you quote doesn’t actually support Barthes: that because for Saussure language is just a network of differences, what Barthes wants is for readers to explore that network, rather than search for the one “positive” meaning.

  • In his article “What is an Author?”  Michel foucault raises many intriguing points including the ethical implications of disregarding an author’s involvement in his work, what an author’s function is, and most […]

    • Thinking about the various film versions is challenging: does James Whale (who directed the most version) somehow gain some of the “author function” if we are more familiar with the film than novel? Or is there some other textual function that allows us to see the novel and film as related but different?

  • When you think about it the idea of a performative work being the culmination of several different interprative bends on the same source material, it makes you wonder who’s interpretation matters the most. Fight Club for instance is fairly different than the source material, and even creates an aesthetic for it. The narrator in Fight Club never…[Read more]

  • Brett Doren commented on the post, Death of the Author, on the site Theory 6 months ago

    This post raises an interesting idea in my mind as to what exactly can the reader kill the author in. By this I mean that could we as readers apply our own interpretation or kill the author, with say a memoir or a historical document. This is the basis of any controversy over the constitution so I’d say logically it can apply to that, but could…[Read more]

  • Brett Doren commented on the post, The Death of The Author, on the site Theory 6 months ago

    Thank you for posting these! They’re very fascinating articles, but it raises another issue, or at least made me think of another thing. If language is metaphoric and a relative means of expressing information about the world around us, then how do these metaphors become settled on? I’m not sure if I can word this entirely right, but since the…[Read more]

  • Brett Doren wrote a new post, The Death of The Author, on the site Theory 6 months ago

    In Barthes Death of The Author, he describes a means of analyzing writing in a completely different manner.  It is asserted that, commonly, too much importance is placed on the role of the author when pulling […]

    • Thank you for posting these! They’re very fascinating articles, but it raises another issue, or at least made me think of another thing. If language is metaphoric and a relative means of expressing information about the world around us, then how do these metaphors become settled on? I’m not sure if I can word this entirely right, but since the very means of communication rely on a set of paradigms as to what a language even means or needs to be, then what would happen if there were a reader who detached themselves in someway from the language. I don’t mean something nonsensical like the word cat suddenly means drastic political upheaval in 19th century Russia, but since it is common sense that one needs language to read, then perhaps that too should be challenged since we challenge common sense.

      I’m not sure at all how that would work, but maybe if grammar rules were discarded and a text was approached in a Bourroughs-esque cut up manner were even the order doesn’t quite matter.