drcb

  • drcb commented on the page, on the site Personality Psychology (740) 4 weeks ago

    Good ideas. I know off-hand that loneliness is conceptualized differently based on culture (eastern cultures see it as an effect of lack of general connections, whereas westerners see it as an effect of lack of romantic love). I also looked up whether any cultures still use exile, and found that it’s still used by various Native American tribes…[Read more]

  • drcb commented on the page, on the site Personality Psychology (740) 4 weeks ago

    To Alice: I was similarly thinking of a harsh example of “exclusion” where someone might be invited politely to a family reunion and then actively shunned by family members.

  • drcb commented on the page, on the site Personality Psychology (740) 4 weeks ago

    I was thinking also about long-term exposure to ostracism, and was thinking solitary confinement could qualify.

  • drcb commented on the page, on the site Personality Psychology (740) 4 weeks ago

    On first thought, it may seem logical that low A people might prefer solitude, but that would be more of a low E (introverted) characteristic (and recall that the B5 traits are pretty independent of one another). Research further shows a lack of correspondence between A and preference for solitude

    e.g., Cramer, K. M., & Lake, R. P. (1998). The…[Read more]

  • drcb commented on the page, on the site Personality Psychology (740) 4 weeks ago

    Indeed about women exhibiting such behaviors. E.g., Brescoll, V. L., & Uhlmann, E. L. (2008). Can an angry woman get ahead? Status conferral, gender, and expression of emotion in the workplace. Psychological science, 19(3), 268-275.

  • drcb commented on the page, on the site Personality Psychology (740) 4 weeks ago

    Self fulfilling prophecies may come into play, but with the low frequency of ostracism, maybe it doesn’t happen much. So the potential is there, but you make a valid point about the random assignment issue.

    • I agree that the cultural parameters of this study were quite reductionist and limiting. I found the finding that “ seems that individualistic cultures enable a less restricted expression of personality, resulting in larger variances and particularly so among men” to be quite interesting. I’m not sure how this generalization could be made if the study population or university students from each culture. Traditionally, university students are not representative of the general population. This broad generalization is problematic considering that university students are exposed to more “individualistic” and western ideals during their academic tenure.

  • drcb commented on the page, on the site Personality Psychology (740) 1 month ago

    Work does show a reduced positive self-judgment bias in depressed individuals

    Dunn, B. D., Stefanovitch, I., Buchan, K., Lawrence, A. D., & Dalgleish, T. (2009). A reduction in positive self-judgment bias is uniquely related to the anhedonic symptoms of depression. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 47(5), 374-381.

  • drcb commented on the page, on the site Personality Psychology (740) 1 month ago

    “I would be curious to see a longitudinal study if changes are actually made”

    Good study idea! That way you could better disentangle whether it’s more than just a positive bias to make oneself feel better about one’s weaknesses.

  • drcb commented on the page, on the site Personality Psychology (740) 1 month ago

    Work shows that people may actually be able to moderately and slowly change their personality traits in desired ways—at least over a short period of time.

    Hudson, N. W., & Fraley, R. C. (2017). Volitional personality change. In Personality development across the lifespan (pp. 555-571). Academic Press.

  • drcb commented on the page, on the site Personality Psychology (740) 1 month ago

    Good point, and you’re definitely on to something. For example, Sandra Murray’s theory of positive illusions. We tend to idealize our romantic partners, partially because they’re a reflection of the self.

  • drcb commented on the page, on the site Personality Psychology (740) 1 month ago

    The subjective value of one’s own traits is a good point, and the fact that feelings of whether they’re a strength or weakness can also change based on the situation or time of life (a la normative shifts in personality over the lifespan, and e.g., N in young adulthood could be helpful if it’s motivating, but later in life N can literally kill us)

    • I found the results of the study quite interesting and perhaps a detriment to the society this study population (psychology undergraduate students from a presumably American institution) was sampling from. The implication from Study 3, that “people expect others to be agreeable unless there is evidence to the contrary” is quite a reductionist way to frame others. Perhaps, this study may highlight why most American voters are likely to choose a candidate based on likability or “agreeableness” from face value – rather than competence and ability. The study design demonstrates that participants will be willing to make judgments on morality and “fairness” simply by an initial impression and no further use of cognitive load. Although there are limitations of generalizability due to the study population, the results may indicate a deficit in the sociopolitical processes in this community.

    • drcb replied 4 weeks ago

      Self fulfilling prophecies may come into play, but with the low frequency of ostracism, maybe it doesn’t happen much. So the potential is there, but you make a valid point about the random assignment issue.

    • drcb replied 4 weeks ago

      Indeed about women exhibiting such behaviors. E.g., Brescoll, V. L., & Uhlmann, E. L. (2008). Can an angry woman get ahead? Status conferral, gender, and expression of emotion in the workplace. Psychological science, 19(3), 268-275.

    • drcb replied 4 weeks ago

      On first thought, it may seem logical that low A people might prefer solitude, but that would be more of a low E (introverted) characteristic (and recall that the B5 traits are pretty independent of one another). Research further shows a lack of correspondence between A and preference for solitude

      e.g., Cramer, K. M., & Lake, R. P. (1998). The Preference for Solitude Scale: Psychometric properties and factor structure. Personality and Individual Differences, 24(2), 193-199.

    • drcb replied 4 weeks ago

      I was thinking also about long-term exposure to ostracism, and was thinking solitary confinement could qualify.

    • drcb replied 4 weeks ago

      To Alice: I was similarly thinking of a harsh example of “exclusion” where someone might be invited politely to a family reunion and then actively shunned by family members.

    • drcb replied 4 weeks ago

      Good ideas. I know off-hand that loneliness is conceptualized differently based on culture (eastern cultures see it as an effect of lack of general connections, whereas westerners see it as an effect of lack of romantic love). I also looked up whether any cultures still use exile, and found that it’s still used by various Native American tribes (not sure where they’d fall on the individualist-collectivist spectrum though). Historically, the Greeks and Romans used it, and later the English.

    • I thought it was interesting that the authors posit that present strengths remain constant, but present weaknesses to improve in the future. I wonder if this outcome is the same for victims of trauma. Does the comorbid depression and effects of the trauma impact there’s self view of their weaknesses and strengths? I would posit that in some cases of trauma, perceived self-esteem may decrease and the malleability of weaknesses may be impacted.

      *Apologies, this was supposed to be in reply to the comment above. I’m not sure how to delete my other statement.

    • drcb replied 1 month ago

      The subjective value of one’s own traits is a good point, and the fact that feelings of whether they’re a strength or weakness can also change based on the situation or time of life (a la normative shifts in personality over the lifespan, and e.g., N in young adulthood could be helpful if it’s motivating, but later in life N can literally kill us)

    • drcb replied 1 month ago

      Good point, and you’re definitely on to something. For example, Sandra Murray’s theory of positive illusions. We tend to idealize our romantic partners, partially because they’re a reflection of the self.

    • drcb replied 1 month ago

      Work shows that people may actually be able to moderately and slowly change their personality traits in desired ways—at least over a short period of time.

      Hudson, N. W., & Fraley, R. C. (2017). Volitional personality change. In Personality development across the lifespan (pp. 555-571). Academic Press.

    • drcb replied 1 month ago

      “I would be curious to see a longitudinal study if changes are actually made”

      Good study idea! That way you could better disentangle whether it’s more than just a positive bias to make oneself feel better about one’s weaknesses.

    • drcb replied 1 month ago

      Work does show a reduced positive self-judgment bias in depressed individuals

      Dunn, B. D., Stefanovitch, I., Buchan, K., Lawrence, A. D., & Dalgleish, T. (2009). A reduction in positive self-judgment bias is uniquely related to the anhedonic symptoms of depression. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 47(5), 374-381.

  • drcb commented on the page, on the site Personality Psychology (740) 2 months ago

    I think you meant this, but to clarify, N would likely inhibit learning.

  • drcb commented on the page, on the site Personality Psychology (740) 2 months ago

    C is normally not associated with intelligence, but perhaps it would be a factor in a study of learning.

  • drcb commented on the page, on the site Personality Psychology (740) 2 months ago

    There was also cognitive ability’s effects in knowledge attainment.

  • drcb commented on the page, on the site Personality Psychology (740) 2 months ago

    I double-checked into the subfacets of O.

    According to the Costa and McCrae model (1992), the six sub-factors of Openness are Fantasy, Aesthetics, Feelings, Actions, Ideas and Values).

    BUT features of Openness are aesthetic sensitivity, awareness of one’s emotions, vivid imagination, preference for novelty and variety and INTELLECTUAL C…[Read more]

  • drcb commented on the page, on the site Personality Psychology (740) 2 months ago

    “personality disorders stem from a deep-seated insecurity or low self-esteem that often is compensated for by some of the grandiose behaviors”

    Similarly, there’s some data showing a heightened rate of narcissism (likely vulnerable) in prison populations. The idea being that these convicts’ underlying sense of self is fragile, and they lashed out.

  • drcb commented on the page, on the site Personality Psychology (740) 2 months ago

    I like your vignettes idea for validation purposes.

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