drcb

  • “random responding is controlled for”

    Often researchers collecting online data will insert an attention check question to control for random responding. When there is no incentive to participate (such as in this study), it’s less of an issue.

  • drcb commented on the page, on the site Personality Psychology (740) 5 months ago

    Hi Ashley,

    In your last paragraph, you seem to be confusing features of attachment anxiety (need for attention, fear of being abandonment, latching onto partners) with avoidance.

  • drcb commented on the page, on the site Personality Psychology (740) 5 months ago

    “the negative consequences of avoidance on relationship dissatisfaction seems like it would be universal”

    It seems most likely, and here the authors found that pattern in 3 countries, just to varying degrees.

  • drcb commented on the page, on the site Personality Psychology (740) 5 months ago

    “Lastly, what about people with secure attachment?”

    Since attachment is measured on a continuum in this paper, you can conceptualize the low ends of anxiety and avoidance as being secure attachment.

  • drcb commented on the page, on the site Personality Psychology (740) 5 months ago

    “perhaps more problems related to avoidant attachment would emerge as time went on in the relationship”

    You’re on to something!

    http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.828.8685&rep=rep1&type=pdf

  • drcb commented on the page, on the site Personality Psychology (740) 5 months ago

    “two people with very distinct personalities cannot relate well”

    Research suggests otherwise, since couples have generally been found to not be similar in their personalities. However, when it comes to values, what you say is correct.

  • drcb commented on the page, on the site Personality Psychology (740) 5 months ago

    Other attachment work on cross-cultural distributions found higher anxiety in Asian samples (You & Malley-Morrison, 2000; Wang & Mallinckrodt, 2006), lower avoidance in African countries (True, Pisani, & Oumar, 2001; Tomlinson et al., 2005), and higher anxiety/lower avoidance in Israel (Sagi, Koren-Karie, Gini, Ziv, & Joels, 2002).

  • Please post on only one paper this week, and indicate which paper you are posting about.

    • “random responding is controlled for”

      Often researchers collecting online data will insert an attention check question to control for random responding. When there is no incentive to participate (such as in this study), it’s less of an issue.

    • “women’s apparent selectiveness in choice that may also be limiting their ability to find a mate in late-life”

      Women are selective in some ways, and pickier too (as shown by their lower mean attractiveness ratings compared to men). On the other hand though, women have less consensus than men on what is attractive, so in other words women are more broad in what they find desirable.

    • 18-25 was the targets’ age (the pictures showed people aged 18-25)

    • Participants varied in age (although 27 was the mean age). Around 1,000 people were over age 50, and we even had some in their nineties.

    • The revealed preference methodology was better explained in the 2009 paper. Basically, 5 raters rated the 97 photos for a variety of characteristics. Then, those photos were shown to the current subjects. So if some photos were rated by the 5 original raters as a “10” for sexy and “10” for conventional, and the subject gives very high ratings to the photos pre-rated as sexy and very low ratings to the photos that were pre-rated as conventional the subject’s “revealed preferences” show that she likes sexy and dislikes conventional people.

    • drcb replied 5 months ago

      Other attachment work on cross-cultural distributions found higher anxiety in Asian samples (You & Malley-Morrison, 2000; Wang & Mallinckrodt, 2006), lower avoidance in African countries (True, Pisani, & Oumar, 2001; Tomlinson et al., 2005), and higher anxiety/lower avoidance in Israel (Sagi, Koren-Karie, Gini, Ziv, & Joels, 2002).

    • drcb replied 5 months ago

      “two people with very distinct personalities cannot relate well”

      Research suggests otherwise, since couples have generally been found to not be similar in their personalities. However, when it comes to values, what you say is correct.

    • drcb replied 5 months ago

      “perhaps more problems related to avoidant attachment would emerge as time went on in the relationship”

      You’re on to something!

      http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.828.8685&rep=rep1&type=pdf

    • drcb replied 5 months ago

      “Lastly, what about people with secure attachment?”

      Since attachment is measured on a continuum in this paper, you can conceptualize the low ends of anxiety and avoidance as being secure attachment.

    • drcb replied 5 months ago

      “the negative consequences of avoidance on relationship dissatisfaction seems like it would be universal”

      It seems most likely, and here the authors found that pattern in 3 countries, just to varying degrees.

    • drcb replied 5 months ago

      Hi Ashley,

      In your last paragraph, you seem to be confusing features of attachment anxiety (need for attention, fear of being abandonment, latching onto partners) with avoidance.

  • Regarding depressive symptoms (or lack thereof), the authors used the Mini-MASQ to assess depression, anxiety, etc., Via this continuous measure, they were able to assess relationships between depression and parental reporting. Any result regarding depression (e.g., Mothers’ general distress was negatively associated with consensus) can be i…[Read more]

  • I think the authors were primarily trying to get at the often observed low r’s between parents’ reports of child temperament.

  • “the way in which the parent views their child may also influence how the child acts”

    Good point. There are so many interactions with this parent-child stuff!

  • Regarding the FAE – good connection. Interestingly, when attention is called to it, the bias goes away. For instance, if a person is told that often people don’t take situations into account when judging others’ behavior, that person will then consider the situation more such that the FAE won’t occur at that time. In the Marshall & Brown paper,…[Read more]

  • “is anger being measured at its best in this study?”
    I had similar issues in the authors conflating anger and aggression – two different things, and one doesn’t necessarily lead to the other.

  • “state that the TASS model is most applicable to traits that have a biological basis”
    They are speculative, but their assumption probably is that the more innate traits are, the harder they are to control.

    • “the way in which the parent views their child may also influence how the child acts”

      Good point. There are so many interactions with this parent-child stuff!

    • I think the authors were primarily trying to get at the often observed low r’s between parents’ reports of child temperament.

    • Regarding depressive symptoms (or lack thereof), the authors used the Mini-MASQ to assess depression, anxiety, etc., Via this continuous measure, they were able to assess relationships between depression and parental reporting. Any result regarding depression (e.g., Mothers’ general distress was negatively associated with consensus) can be interpreted for people who are NOT depressed as well. So for the result I mentioned, moms who were not distressed had higher consensus.

  • drcb commented on the page, on the site Personality Psychology (740) 6 months ago

    About the question that came up in class – if getting divorced changes one’s personality. Allemand, Hill & Lehmann (2015) found it does somewhat. People who divorced decreased in positive affect and extraversion, and conscientiousness went down a bit too. http://www.michelleschoenleber.com/uploads/5/4/0/4/5404776/allemand_et_al_(2015).pdf

  • drcb commented on the page, on the site Personality Psychology (740) 6 months ago

    Please note that personality was measured via the self-reported BFI score, and not the behaviors (withdrawn, etc.,)

  • drcb commented on the page, on the site Personality Psychology (740) 6 months ago

    Often terms like “warmth” are open to coders’ intuition based on life experience and knowledge, but there must be agreement between the raters for the outcomes to be meaningful.

  • drcb commented on the page, on the site Personality Psychology (740) 6 months ago

    The authors say they had “a team of” coders but are unclear as to how many. In any case, in research where behavior is being coded, you’d want to look at the inter-rater reliability to make sure that the behavior is being coded consistently between the research team.

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