drcb

  • I agree using mom’s education was an unusual delineation. Could it have been used because it created more interesting results?

    Also, I like your survival mode ideas. This could literally relate to issues of hunger in lower SES folks.

  • The thought about technology and kids crossed my mind too. Kids may be less used to “doing nothing” these days because they use ipads, etc., (and same for adults too)

    • You speculate correctly that attachment avoidance corresponds to low A and E, and attachment anxiety positively correlates with N.

      Also, a point of clarification that low anxiety and low avoidance = security, so secure attachment was in fact represented in this study.

    • “collectivist people may see their attachment anxiety as a direct result of the shortcomings in their relationship, so they will report worse relationship satisfaction”

      That’s a good potential explanation, especially if they’re more relationship-oriented in collectivist cultures.

    • (an example of “avoidance”, not having a fight rather refusing the fight itself. And another thing you mentioned regarding self-disclosure)

      This is a good example of how avoidance can be (sort of) beneficial.

    • Some argue (Cindy Hazan), that it takes 2 full years for a full-fledged attachment bond to form!

    • The thought about technology and kids crossed my mind too. Kids may be less used to “doing nothing” these days because they use ipads, etc., (and same for adults too)

    • I agree using mom’s education was an unusual delineation. Could it have been used because it created more interesting results?

      Also, I like your survival mode ideas. This could literally relate to issues of hunger in lower SES folks.

    • Were you thinking that siblings may create greater competition, and thus greater likelihood to quickly eat the treat?

  • drcb commented on the page, on the site Personality Psychology (740) 5 months ago

    We’ll cover biology/heritability of personality on March 4. Usually it’s determined by twin and adoption studies.

  • drcb commented on the page, on the site Personality Psychology (740) 5 months ago

    There are certainly ethical issues in the measurement of aggression in research. Typically, noise bursts or hot pepper shots (amount administered) are used as stand-ins for actual physical aggression. Study 1 was unusual in that the subjects didn’t directly “administer” the noise.

  • drcb commented on the page, on the site Personality Psychology (740) 5 months ago

    I wondered whether there may have been ceiling effects for high TA in the strong provocation condition.

  • drcb commented on the page, on the site Personality Psychology (740) 5 months ago

    As it’s thought of in the social psych literature, there is a direct connection between aggression scores and aggressive acts (whether verbal, physical, etc.,). Impulsivity could further exacerbate that tendency though.

  • drcb commented on the page, on the site Personality Psychology (740) 5 months ago

    Aggression tends to correlate negatively with agreeableness and conscientiousness, and positively with neuroticism (e.g., Ang et al., 2004).

    There are some lifespan developmental mean-level trends in aggression too. Toddler years are the most aggressive for most (but they don’t do much damage because they’re small). In the preschool and early…[Read more]

  • drcb commented on the page, on the site Personality Psychology (740) 5 months ago

    High TA individuals would be assumed to be partially so due to genetics, since aggression has shown to be heritable ~65%. Then the rest necessarily stems from environment. And here in this study, the effects of immediate environmental conditions is shown.

  • drcb commented on the page, on the site Personality Psychology (740) 5 months ago

    Your ideas remind me of the concepts of anger-in(tendency to suppress anger), anger-out(tendency to express anger.

    You also bring up the issue of studying atypical events in life (such as aggression) versus studying everyday events. It seems social psych research is often geared toward studying unusual events, rather than the mundane.

  • drcb commented on the page, on the site Personality Psychology (740) 5 months ago

    I think they were operating under the standard social psych definition of aggression which is, behavior intended to harm another who is motivated to avoid the harm.

    • Hi Sara,
      Regarding your first thought, I think we shared the same concerns but you put it in better words. Basically you think that emotional stability type traits are more situational dependent than other traits? Am I right?
      And can we really separate emotional stability from executive function capacities? Isn’t emotional stability depends on our ability to inhibit and self regulate?

    • drcb replied 5 months ago

      I think they were operating under the standard social psych definition of aggression which is, behavior intended to harm another who is motivated to avoid the harm.

    • drcb replied 5 months ago

      Your ideas remind me of the concepts of anger-in(tendency to suppress anger), anger-out(tendency to express anger.

      You also bring up the issue of studying atypical events in life (such as aggression) versus studying everyday events. It seems social psych research is often geared toward studying unusual events, rather than the mundane.

    • drcb replied 5 months ago

      High TA individuals would be assumed to be partially so due to genetics, since aggression has shown to be heritable ~65%. Then the rest necessarily stems from environment. And here in this study, the effects of immediate environmental conditions is shown.

    • drcb replied 5 months ago

      Aggression tends to correlate negatively with agreeableness and conscientiousness, and positively with neuroticism (e.g., Ang et al., 2004).

      There are some lifespan developmental mean-level trends in aggression too. Toddler years are the most aggressive for most (but they don’t do much damage because they’re small). In the preschool and early elementary years, physical aggression decreases, and verbal aggression increases. 15 – 35 yrs old is the peak of violence. There’s also the issue of heterotypic continuity, whereby aggression manifests differently depending on age, but the tendency is stable.

    • drcb replied 5 months ago

      As it’s thought of in the social psych literature, there is a direct connection between aggression scores and aggressive acts (whether verbal, physical, etc.,). Impulsivity could further exacerbate that tendency though.

    • drcb replied 5 months ago

      I wondered whether there may have been ceiling effects for high TA in the strong provocation condition.

    • drcb replied 5 months ago

      There are certainly ethical issues in the measurement of aggression in research. Typically, noise bursts or hot pepper shots (amount administered) are used as stand-ins for actual physical aggression. Study 1 was unusual in that the subjects didn’t directly “administer” the noise.

    • drcb replied 5 months ago

      We’ll cover biology/heritability of personality on March 4. Usually it’s determined by twin and adoption studies.

  • I also didn’t buy the Jungian explanations. E does correlate with negative qualities such as narcissism (e.g., Holtzman, Vazire, & Mehl, 2010).

  • Do you have cites for the findings on C and word choice?

  • I agree it could have potentially been projection for the N findings. The finding should probably be replicated to see if it holds true.

  • Good application ideas in different group settings! As long as there are enough agreeable people to go around 🙂

  • There’s always a trade-off between internal and external validity. This study tried to be naturalistic by having the interaction in-lab. But there’s still the question of how these things would work in the true “real world.”

    • Ariel, I think your last question is interesting and bring the egg-chicken dilemma. I would say a person is too subjective to testify on his own personality and it should be evaluated by his interaction with others coded by observers. However, there are some that are able to evaluate themselves accurately without any bias. Their evaluation of themselves will be similar to the evaluation done by an objective observer. The ability to evaluate yourself with or without any bias depends on your personality though. Hence, both self evaluation and objective evaluation can or perhaps should be used in order to assess someone’s personality.

    • There’s always a trade-off between internal and external validity. This study tried to be naturalistic by having the interaction in-lab. But there’s still the question of how these things would work in the true “real world.”

    • Good application ideas in different group settings! As long as there are enough agreeable people to go around 🙂

    • I agree it could have potentially been projection for the N findings. The finding should probably be replicated to see if it holds true.

    • Do you have cites for the findings on C and word choice?

    • I also didn’t buy the Jungian explanations. E does correlate with negative qualities such as narcissism (e.g., Holtzman, Vazire, & Mehl, 2010).

    • For those of you interested in personality change:

      https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/94bd/6330b7cab012a342270a167a78ada0c1df88.pdf

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