etanzer

  • I thought this class was useful to me as a teacher, which is basically the best compliment I can provide. Thank you for the opportunity to expand my point of view on teaching writing and for giving me more opportunities to be creative.

  • etanzer commented on the blog post 5/12 Standards 10 years, 5 months ago

    Lil Brannon said it best when she wrote that “Standards, even those we agree with, even those that are constructed with good intentions, can and do turn into repressive dogma” (445). This is the unfortunate reality. The new Common Core State Standards (CCSS for those in the know) are now being enforced across the land. […]

  • etanzer commented on the blog post 5/05 Revision 10 years, 5 months ago

    I really liked the Christyne Berzseyni article on “Comments to Comments.” I think that this can be a really thoughtful way to get students to respond to errors in their own writing and be reflective about what is good in their own writing. I don’t know if I’d be able to maintain my focus on […]

  • etanzer commented on the blog post 4/28 Responding 10 years, 6 months ago

    I think Nancy Sommers is probably right about the way teachers mark papers. She says that frequently “the comments are worded in such a way that it is difficult for students to know what is the most important problem in the text and what problems are of lesser importance.” (151) I could see that being […]

  • I was a little dismissive of the “technology in the classroom”idea, but not for any good reason. Perhaps it was just my prejudice towards the five paragraph essay that caused my dismissal. But after having read the articles for this week, I must admit I’m finding the assignments suggested to be very exciting and purposeful […]

  • I really liked the article by Mike Rose. I thought it was really thoughtful– this is a person who has worked with real students, rather than just the concept of students. The idea of kids who know how to “do school” rather than people who have actually gained skills through their schooling is a real […]

  • I thought that the Howard article on Authorships was somewhat… idealized. However, I thought the Vicky Tuck article was just right. The information that students have at hand is an undeniable temptation. Jen picked out the perfect quote from that piece, “the real challenge is not to beat the cheat, but to train the brain.” […]

  • Like Jen, I thought that Howard’s suggestions for how to structure a collaborative writing assignment were quite useful. What she says about how many adult jobs require that a finished project be completed by a group is true, although I probably would never have thought about it. Even in our “teacher teams” or “grade level […]

  • I thought the Bartholomae article was interesting, probably because the kind of writing that he advocates does not really happen in my classroom. I agree with Bartholomae when he says that “the struggle of the student writer is not the struggle to bring out that which is within; it is the struggle to carry out […]

  • etanzer commented on the blog post 3/03 Grammar 10 years, 7 months ago

    In general, I tend to agree with Hartwell, especially when it comes to the way that I learned English grammar. I learned it through Grammar 1. I remember thinking in the seventh grade how stupid it was to sit there with the stupid orange grammar textbook, and its stupid grammar rules. I knew this already. […]

  • I think Brandt’s point-of-view in the first chapter of the article is a useful one to consider when we take a look at the students that we are teaching. We have to know who we are teaching. That is to say, what is their background, where do they come from, where do they want to […]

  • P.S. Sorry this is so late.

  • i found the first article, “A Social Critique of the Judgement of Taste” to be very interesting, in that it states what I’ve always believed. Do we like what we like because we’re supposed to like it? Do we like what we like because we’re trained to like it? Because we’re expected to like it? […]

  • I think the main adjective I’d like to use to describe slam poetry is “cool.” I think that whole movement is “cool”: counter-culture, late night cafes, rocking your poetry out in front of a shouting audience… I can’t think of anything cooler. I like how slam attempts to exist outside of the usual poetry genres. […]

  • etanzer commented on the blog post 10/21 Performativity 11 years ago

    Can I just start by saying, can you imagine if you were at that wedding? I would be annoyed, personally. I actually enjoyed the Derrida, although I wouldn’t presume to say that I understood all of it. I don’t think this is necessarily central to the entire text, I found it interesting that many of […]

  • http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=11223359

    This is the npr piece on homophobia in rap

  • James’ question of who relies on whom more, linguistically speaking: the artist or the audience is one that I thought of right away while listening to the Def Jam recording of “Poetry is Black.” I think they rely on each other very heavily. In that particular performance I could feel the performer feeding off the […]

  • etanzer commented on the blog post 10/7 Rhythm & Beats 11 years ago

    My first impression of “Howl” was that it made me feel like a crazy person. The repetitions, the stream of consciousness text, the insistence of the sound of Kerouac’s voice—it made me feel like I was going nuts. I suppose that’s okay—as they said in the podcast, poems are allowed to be zany. But for […]

  • etanzer commented on the blog post 9/30 Sound as Poetry 11 years ago

    I suppose I’d need to start this post with that teacher’s adage of “well children, what IS poetry?” I loved how each piece was incredibly different and yet they still shared elements of repetition, alliteration, and had a structure. The Kurt Schwitter piece “Zweiter Teil: Largo” was off-putting (especially at 6:30 in the morning), and […]

  • On principle I have to disagree with what the author has said about sign languages, that “despite the richness of gesture, elaborated gestures or sign languages are substitutes for speech and dependent on oral speech systems even when used by the congenitally deaf.” (7) True, in the past teachers of the deaf focused on teaching […]