gfisk

  • On December 18 (by midnight), you’ll submit:

    The first three pages of your thesis, your actual thesis! As in, not *writing about your thesis*, but the actual first three pages of the thing, as you understand […]

  • Thanks, everyone-!! I’m so glad to see a satisfying resolution on the horizon, and I’m excited to read this list with you in the spring.

  • gfisk commented on the page, on the site What Good is Literature? 1 week ago

    P.S. (Sorry for always doing that!), with a small point: Both classes submitted lists that had 6 men and 4 women, so that ratio remained constant across both.

  • gfisk commented on the page, on the site What Good is Literature? 1 week ago

    Khurram, I think you are a hero of these negotiations. I commend you for your efforts, from beginning to end!– to reach a solution that is intellectually sound as well as reasonably satisfying to all concerned. Salutations to you, and to everybody!

  • It’s the last week of classes, holy moly. I will miss you guys! But I will still see all of you, phew, as my colleagues, and I will be running First Year Writing again next spring, so I’ll be doing workshops and […]

  • gfisk posted a new page, on the site What Good is Literature? 1 week ago

    IT’S THE LAST WEEK OF CLASSES!

    When we meet, we will:

    Revisit the exam list if necessary;
    Share thesis presentations;
    Draw up calendars for your theses;
    Discuss the (very short!) readings for this […]

  • gfisk posted a new page, on the site What Good is Literature? 1 week ago

    On the last day of our class, you’ll have a chance to:

    Share your idea for your thesis with the rest of us;
    Invite questions about it; and then
    Ask questions you have about your plan at this po […]

  • gfisk posted a new page, on the site What Good is Literature? 1 week ago

    UPDATE: The committee has approved an abridged version of Pamela if you prefer it. For more details, see my comment below.

    I wrote this comment before I knew that, and Khurram and Jordan responded before th […]

    • Phillis* Wheatley

    • gfisk replied 1 week ago

      Khurram, I think you are a hero of these negotiations. I commend you for your efforts, from beginning to end!– to reach a solution that is intellectually sound as well as reasonably satisfying to all concerned. Salutations to you, and to everybody!

    • gfisk replied 1 week ago

      P.S. (Sorry for always doing that!), with a small point: Both classes submitted lists that had 6 men and 4 women, so that ratio remained constant across both.

    • This sounds good to me Khurram, thanks for suggesting and outlining it in such detail. I think this is a good fit to assuage some of our classes concerns and maintain what both sections want out of the list.

    • I completely agree with Khurram, and I think Wheatley is the best compromise for both classes while also being flexible enough to use on the exam. Great suggestion and I hope we can all now move forward in agreement.

      • Thanks, everyone-!! I’m so glad to see a satisfying resolution on the horizon, and I’m excited to read this list with you in the spring.

      • I concur with this opinion. I think that’s a great substitution of the novel and it satisfies the requirements. There has been a lot of debate and I hope as well, that this will be something we can all agree with.

    • I agree with your analysis and proposal.
      It places me at ease and from the comments on the blog, I feel others agree.
      Thank you for taking the time to provide us with an outline.

      I have read Phillis Wheatley before and I have found her poems to be dense but her history/literary content makes her a great candidate for our list.

  • gfisk commented on the page, on the site What Good is Literature? 1 week, 1 day ago

    P. P. S. I hope everybody is excited about the list + the parties we’ll have reading.

  • gfisk commented on the page, on the site What Good is Literature? 1 week, 1 day ago

    I hear your concerns! I will talk to the honors committee about the possibility of reading an abridged version of Pamela. (There are a couple of abridged versions that have 200 pages or fewer.)

    I am very hesitant to switch it for a different text at this point. There is a pervasive feeling in the evening class that they’ve given up a lot of…[Read more]

  • gfisk commented on the page, on the site What Good is Literature? 1 week, 1 day ago

    P.S. The evening class is also accepting the afternoon class’s addition of More’s Utopia, which is significant, too.

  • gfisk commented on the page, on the site What Good is Literature? 1 week, 1 day ago

    Compromises are being made! The evening class is:

    -Conceding to the afternoon class on:
    The addition of Wharton
    The addition of More’s Utopia
    Omitting Harriet Jacobs
    Omitting Swift
    Taking your point about Antony & Cleopatra

    Arguing with the afternoon class on:
    Replacing Defoe with Richardson
    Replacing Ginsberg with Boyer*

    *The…[Read more]

  • gfisk commented on the page, on the site What Good is Literature? 1 week, 2 days ago

    I’m writing quickly to say: The afternoon class is proposing this, and we’ll discuss tonight.

    To all: If you have thoughts that we should ponder in tonight’s discussion, please post them here!

    And thank you, all, for *keeping it real*

    ***

    Sophocles, Antigone
    More, Utopia
    Shakespeare: something more widely read than Antony &…[Read more]

  • gfisk commented on the page, on the site What Good is Literature? 1 week, 3 days ago

    P. P. S. One more thing: I think if you put Shakespeare on the list, the department will consider that covered. You won’t end up with two plays by Shakespeare.

  • gfisk commented on the page, on the site What Good is Literature? 1 week, 3 days ago

    P.S. One more thing: We probably shouldn’t have too much work in translation on the list, sadly. (I say “sadly” because, as you know, I incline in that direction, personally.)

    Since you’ll only have 20 texts on your exam in total, and the degree you’re getting is in *English* literature, there will be a general expectation that most of the…[Read more]

  • gfisk commented on the page, on the site What Good is Literature? 1 week, 3 days ago

    I’m weighing in kind of late here to say:

    First: You guys are awesome. The questions you’re raising about the list are all really good ones, and I’m so impressed with the quality of your debate about them. Thank you, all– and, especially, Khurram, who has weighed in a few time to represent the minority interests of the Wednesday class. Writing…[Read more]

  • I can’t believe our next class date is Dec. 4.

    And as I’m noting all the good/bad things that are implied for me by that date (more unscheduled days > impending deadlines), I’m also noting what I know it […]

  • gfisk posted a new page, on the site What Good is Literature? 2 weeks ago

    WE HAVE SO MUCH TO DISCUSS. This week, you are:

    Mulling over your ideas for your thesis so you can finish this semester with a clear sense of your method, your plan, your purpose, your motive;
    Finishing […]

  • I’ll submit the list of your ten texts to the honors committee next week, so I’m creating this space for you guys to negotiate with each other now. 

    And I think we have to have some of that negotiation here, […]

    • I vote off 2, 3, and 9.

      I think Jordan is right and the exam will definitely include a Shakespeare, so it’s just a matter of whether we want to pick it ourselves or not. If we do include a Shakespeare, I’d prefer it if it was something more of us have read, Othello, The Tempest, or Hamlet. Jonathan Swift and Anne Boyer are redundant. I also…[Read more]

    • I see where you’re coming from in regards to controlling the canon. My worry is, especially in regards to Shakespeare, that there are texts that the department are going to put on the list regardless of our list. I don’t think that The Tempest is going to be left off. Same with Frankenstein. I’m concerned that if we end up trying to control the…[Read more]

    • Still wary of “Howl”? This blog post provides a useful brief breakdown of it:

      Allen Ginsberg’s Howl

      *quote above pulled from it.

    • Forgive my lack of knowledge on this, this is an actual question that comes from a gap in my knowledge, but if we want more nonwestern representation would that mean swaps from our post-19th-century selections, or would our submitted list skew modern? Not saying that non-westerners didn’t write pre-20th century, by the way, just that I don’t…[Read more]

      • I imagine the Dept. would fill in the gaps of our list with pre-20th century. I wouldn’t mind our list skewing more modern in that case.

    • I think I really agree with Emily’s list. Howl is by no means a hard poem, offers a lot of variety in terms of topics, and works well with a lot of the other literature. For Shakespeare, Hamlet can also be very useful with the other texts. I know we were pretty much in agreement on Citizen, Antigone, Mrs. Dalloway, and Beloved in class, but I…[Read more]

    • I agree with Kaitlin that adding a text in translation would be fitting for list, for the purposes of variety and diversity of perspectives. Since both classes seem to have omitted Pamuk’s novel from the short list, I like the suggestion of including Don Quixote. I agree that it could take the place of a work from Shakespeare or a slave narrative…[Read more]

    • Since I’m having major writer’s block, I thought I’d put together a form where we can vote on the suggestions on this thread. Texts don’t have to be selected based on a majority vote, but it might be helpful for us to see where everyone’s at in one place. Let me know if you want me to add other questions/texts.

      https://goo.gl/forms/y6ODgrCQsSHrkkJl2

    • I’m weighing in kind of late here to say:

      First: You guys are awesome. The questions you’re raising about the list are all really good ones, and I’m so impressed with the quality of your debate about them. Thank you, all– and, especially, Khurram, who has weighed in a few time to represent the minority interests of the Wednesday class. Writing…[Read more]

    • Yep, I understand. I think your belief is very compelling, and I hope everyone gets a chance to consider it, which is the purpose of this forum. Especially for us outside your session. Same logic for the canon control strategy. For the record, I suggested controlling the canon to our session, so this isn’t like a “digging in with my unmoving…[Read more]

    • P.S. One more thing: We probably shouldn’t have too much work in translation on the list, sadly. (I say “sadly” because, as you know, I incline in that direction, personally.)

      Since you’ll only have 20 texts on your exam in total, and the degree you’re getting is in *English* literature, there will be a general expectation that most of the…[Read more]

    • P. P. S. One more thing: I think if you put Shakespeare on the list, the department will consider that covered. You won’t end up with two plays by Shakespeare.

    • P.S. If i am being 10000% honesty I kinda don’t really care about which books we choose as long as they are arguable, understandable, won’t make my head hurt, and won’t take long to read.
      Just keeping it real,
      Sam

      • th provide context: because we will have a lot to focus on with out thesises??? theses?? thesi (for plural, not sure). and on top of that other classes, work (if you do work) and other resposibilites. so I’m down with anything as long as it wn’t be too hard and fit that personal criteria that I’m sure that we all have in mind.

        -Sam

    • I’m writing quickly to say: The afternoon class is proposing this, and we’ll discuss tonight.

      To all: If you have thoughts that we should ponder in tonight’s discussion, please post them here!

      And thank you, all, for *keeping it real*

      ***

      Sophocles, Antigone
      More, Utopia
      Shakespeare: something more widely read than Antony &…[Read more]

    • Compromises are being made! The evening class is:

      -Conceding to the afternoon class on:
      The addition of Wharton
      The addition of More’s Utopia
      Omitting Harriet Jacobs
      Omitting Swift
      Taking your point about Antony & Cleopatra

      Arguing with the afternoon class on:
      Replacing Defoe with Richardson
      Replacing Ginsberg with Boyer*

      *The…[Read more]

      • As disappointed as I am about losing Howl, I am now more worried about Pamela. There is a lot on here that not everyone has read and Pamela is incredibly long – could there be a more accessible 18-19th century epistolary text we could substitute out? I read the Coquette this semester in my American Literature course and it was incredibly…[Read more]

        • I also agree with Jordan because while I am fine with the rest of the texts on the list I do feel that we should not have Richardson’s text on the list. This is a text I haven’t personally read before and we definitely need another women writer on the list. Looking at Foster’s text I see that connections can be made in regards to social class…[Read more]

    • P.S. The evening class is also accepting the afternoon class’s addition of More’s Utopia, which is significant, too.

    • I hear your concerns! I will talk to the honors committee about the possibility of reading an abridged version of Pamela. (There are a couple of abridged versions that have 200 pages or fewer.)

      I am very hesitant to switch it for a different text at this point. There is a pervasive feeling in the evening class that they’ve given up a lot of…[Read more]

    • P. P. S. I hope everybody is excited about the list + the parties we’ll have reading.

  • Omg, it’s week 13. Your drafts of your seminar paper are due, and I want to use the occasion to do two things:

    Do a workshop and some peer review together, imitating the ways you do these things with your […]

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