Guadalupe Bueno

  • Guadalupe Bueno commented on the blog post Technology 7 years, 5 months ago

    I agree, the use of technology widens our perspective on literacy, and what it means to be so. Video games involve active reasoning and so are stimulating. As gee, commented, the simplicity of a video game is often times overlooked; however, they do strike a chord, and enable for critical analysis. Furthermore, the Purdy article […]

  • In response to your first question, I believe that technology can be used. We live in a global- technological globe that expands as I am typing this very response. In this very class, the use of technology has widen our conversations, and made us aware of others’s viewpoints, and the value behind a blog. Different […]

  • Canagarajah’s approach although creative, I think Peter Elbow’s code-switching is best. Although both code versions allow the native language to serve as an aid, I too think that allowing ELL’s to use their native language in academic writing instill a habit that will not be tolerated elsewhere, unless the student is an accomplished published author […]

  • As a former ELL student, I can say that immersing into the American classroom was not easy. However, I found receptiveness from the teachers, and this aided a lot. The very difficulty of the acquisition of the language was an inspiration. I agree with what Travis says about possible uncomfortable feelings, and separation, because I […]

  •      ” A skill, particularly in the university setting, is well, a tool, something one develops          and refines and completes in order to take on the higher-order  demands of purer thought”      In The Language of Exclusion: Writing Instruction at the University , by Mike Rose, the author, includes the above definition from the […]

  • The questions that you ask are eyeopeners in the sense that you open you eye more and see what you have always seen, almost like a “known secret” that everyone knows, but dares not to tell. I think Lil Brannon would answer the first question-Are standards anti-teacher ?-with a NO. With standards teacher must maneuver […]

  • By following the standards are we then using a mold similar to that of the five paragraph essay ? It seems so, moreover, students are caught in the middle of politics, and then everyone wonders why students do poorly. Needless to say, this is a cyclical issue that keeps on expanding, unless the teachers have […]

  • I agree on the key of it all being: balance. Assuming that students have been sufficiently exposed to it is not the answer. I believe that grammar has been wrongly mystified as “evil” and a dreaded area of study for students, and its in part because of what you mentioned, the manner in which it […]

  • I believe that if a teacher focuses solely on mistakes the student will inevitably be fearsome. This however, is the current practice going on in classrooms, and it’s just in grade school but in college as well. This stems from a distorted view of grammar that has sprung from classroom practices fixated on error free….everything. […]

  • Richard H. Haswell’s method resonates as a prudent form of grading on the teachers’ behalf because the student is responsible to evaluate what was incorrect . I do not see it as a lack of action from the teacher. We have all learned through trial and error, and most of what we learn has resulted […]

  • First of all, the metaphor you mentioned is insightful. If one views student writers as performers and ourselves as conductors, we are submerging ourselves with new eyes into the core of teaching and what it really means. It is no doubt then, that if others do the work for you , minimal or no learning […]

  • Writing is a practice that allows for the tangible expression of  thought. This week’s readings on “Revision, writing it over and over again” cover the process of revision, and the effects it has on students’ advancement. But before diving into the issue, let’s recapitulate on our own practices. As college students, we have written substantial amount of essays throughout […]

  • The ideas presented by Deborah M. Dean are definitely alternatives that can guide students away from the straight-jacket effect the five paragraph essays has on ideas. I think that the alternative she proposes emphasizes the comprehension of what the five-paragraph essay highlights, this not being the number of paragraphs but rather the language…[Read more]

  • These weeks readings focusing on the five-paragraph essay are sure to bring various viewpoints. After reading the essay by Kimberly Smith, I also could not help but think that Stanley Fish would agree with her. However, I prefer to distance myself from such ideas, because although having a set structure this format, like a cookie-cutter, […]

  • Before further comments, I must say that your post’s title and tone are witty and brought Tina Turner’s song to my mind, with chorus and all. I agree with the the idea of students becoming “self-sponsors” of their work., because it allows them to have pride and sense of ownership of their work, which was […]

  • I absolutely agree with your responses to both of the chapters. Yes, both informal and formal writing assignments have their benefits; however, there will always remain questions that impede the absolute success of one form over the other. In regards to the question dealing with the assessment in the case of “the dilemma played out […]

  • After reading your post in relation to the essays, a word clicked: Motivation. If a student is not motivated to write on a particular subject, that student will only develop a vague and “boring” paper. I am not saying that the teacher should not propose an essay’s topic, but perhaps by offering a choice that […]

  • The rhetorical balance that Booth highlights in the essay emphasizes the role of both the audience and writer. Therefore, if this is something that all students have been told why is it a problem? I dare say that this is in part of because of the long history of the teacher- student dynamic that freezes […]

  • Guadalupe Bueno English 703- Composition Theory and Literacy Studies Professor Ferguson 27 February 2012 Literacy Narrative The acquisition of an additional language is an asset to any individual. Currently many educational programs claim the learning of a new language in a prompt manner that will inevitably open to the path to successes. However, there are […]

  • Well, as Brandt exalted in Sponsors of Literacy those with a higher socio-economic status have been the sponsors, and consequently the privileged sponsored receive the better fruits of literacy. Sadly enough, the “literacy drop” you mentioned is often times controlled by the very institutions-governments, at many times- that hinder growth. The…[Read more]

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