joshuak314

  • “Lord of the Rings”- everyone desires the ring. Everyone desires money and success. We put the world at risk by thinking only of our own desires. This is due to the failure of the education system in the US and the improper use of media. “Les Miserables”- Unfair laws. Rich spoiled kids leading a revolution. […]

  • At the time James was writing, society had strict guidelines for how men and women should act. We see all the females in “The Turn of the Screw” follow those gender roles, or seem to follow it when viewed by other people. The governess takes the traditional female role of caretaker of the house and […]

  • Question 1: The female characters in the text are the governess, Ms Jessel, Mrs Grose and Flora. The governess is the well-educated caretaker of Flora and Mile. She seems to belong to the middle class. Mrs Grose is the illiterate servant of the Bly estate and therefore in the lower part of the social class. […]

  • 4) Notable characters who are no longer present. I thought the comments of one of the guests in the prologue seemed to loom over the whole story. When the guest says “And what did the former governess die of? Of so much respectability?” He seemed to be suggesting that the governess was not respectable at […]

  • Civility/savagery and dream/reality were the two binaries which our group(group 2) discussed and though most important in our assigned passage. Between the two, the binary of civility/savagery was most relevant to the novel as a whole. Heart of Darkness seemed more like an informative essay in which the author Joseph Conrad attempted to show life […]

  • Marlow is portrayed as a pretty decent and nice guy. He tries to give the starving slave a biscuit and he treats the cannibals with him fairly well. He seems to try and do what’s right. Yet he still views the people there as uncivilized and not quite human (he states they are “not inhuman” […]

  • Jen and Victorian did a good job deconstructing the text. They pointed out the major parts of the story where seeing seemed to be undercut by blindness. All the things Napoleon seems to see he is actually not really seeing. Not only are his physical observations false but also his moral observations as well. The […]

  • I believe a reader-oriented approach was very effective when reading “The Man Who Was Almost a Man”. It helped me really delve into the story and experience the story and its setting. Being completely emotionally involved and not looking at the text only in a technical aspect helped me understand and sympathize with the main […]

  • Dear Dr. Brooks When I first came upon New Criticism I immediately thought that it was useless. I believed the purpose of literature to be something which needed to be decided by each individual, since one work may be significant to one person and be completely useless to another. The idea that you could criticize […]

  • After reading the poem many times I disagree with what both bloggers say the key tension is. I personally believe that the key tension lies in the first line of the first two stanzas. These lines are “One must have a mind of winter” and “And have been cold a long time”. How exactly does […]

  • I will be commenting on the painting by Salvador Dali. Salvador Dali is actually one of my favorite artists. I was pleasantly surprised to see one of his works in your blog! This painting is titled The Disintegration of the Persistence of Memory(I actually could not remember the title and looked it up on google). […]