Kaylin Parisi

  • Knight seems to protest his ancestry in an almost masochistic, spiteful manner. He conveys a strong feeling of isolation and detachment from his large family; despite sharing a name with “1 grandfather, 3 cousins, […]

    • Many of the aspects Kaylin said about “The Idea of Ancestry” I fully agree with. I, too, believe this poem shows the isolation this prisoner feels and how he doesn’t feel connected to his family. An idea that jumped out at me was that the narrator is nervous he will be connected to his uncle, who seems to be a disappointment to the family. The use of Knight separating his poem with numbers shows the life of this man in prison and his life without. The first part is written with structure while the second part is written in more of a sloppy structure. This may convey that his life is more stable in prison, whereas outside of prison, the narrators life was dangerous and harmful.

    • In Knight’s “Idea of Ancestry” the speaker talks about his family and tells how they are so similar but can also be so different. It seems in a way that he’s lamenting the fact that he is so different from his family. He says, “I am all of them, / they are all of me, I am me, they are thee, and I have no children / to float in the space between.” He tells how he has such a huge family in such detail and then says how he having no kids is another way in which he doesn’t fit in to his family.

    • Like Kaylin explains Knight “conveys a strong feeling of isolation and detachment from his large family.” In Knights poem he separates himself from his family saying “they are farmers, I am a thief, I am me, they are thee.” Knight separates this poem to clearly show us how just because someone looks just like their family and is a part of a family, does not mean they are the same like them. In the first part, Part 1 Knight goes into detail about all his family members who he shares genes and names with. In part one you would think Knight and his family are literally one. That’s why Knight separates his poem with numbers to show they are not one family unite. Part 2 explains how they are two completely different people Knight and the rest of his family “I am me, they are thee.”

    • For the structure of Knight’s “The Idea of Ancestry”, I have a similar reasoning as to why it is separated by numbers as Max’s. The main reason for this is to break up the poet’s life into two sections; before he was imprisoned, and life in jail. The first part of the poem is set in the present tense, in a very structured, organized fashion as the protagonist is in jail and his creativity as well as his freedom is limited. This section does not even come across as a stanza at all, rather as a paragraph. In the second part of the poem, the poet looks back on his life and reminds himself of the freedom he once had. This is the reason for his often peculiar sentence structure in the second part of the poem as well as the reason it sounds more poetic.

    • When initially looking at the format of the poem, I noticed that is it split into two parts. In the first line of the poem the speaker states, “Taped to the wall of my cell are 47 pictures: 47 black faces” (1). Of the speakers experience in prison he remembers looking at these photos and connecting with these family members, almost as if they are alive and are able to talk to him. The number itself is important because it is huge number that represents not only his family but pieces of him. “They stare across the space at me sprawling on my bunk. I know their dark eyes, they know mine” (5-7). He is identifying with these photos, even sharing his own identity with them, and perhaps taking on their identity. I believe that the use of numbers is to place an emphasis on the amount of family members/ancestors he identifies with, even how much of our ancestry flows within us, or that we carry with us. It could be showing quantity of personalities and identities in a more unique way.

  • The new sentence is an interesting literary strategy in addressing the ever-present issue of correctly, if not as accurately, depicting life itself. Life is a culmination of fragments; experiences, emotions, […]

  • Plath establishes the “I” and the apostrophe of her father very distinctly and opposite to one another, alienating herself from every aspect of what represents or is reminiscent of her father’s presence. She very obviously feels victimized, if not intimidated by, her father, which she had at one point considered a deified figure. This is inter…[Read more]

  • One could argue that the entire poem is a reflection of Ginsberg; all art, in some form, is a projection of the artist, intentional or otherwise. There could be elements of Ginsberg in every “verse,” as well there should be. However, I’d have to side with Conor on his stance that Ginsberg, while of course reflecting on his own state, speaks more…[Read more]

  • I don’t believe Ginsberg intended sarcasm in referring to these people as “great minds”; to me, this choice in description signifies sympathy for victims of drug addiction, as well as a lamentation for what could be considered the lost generation. He illustrates the concept of the unfairness of life, and the power of situational influences in this…[Read more]

  • I do agree with the idea of the narrator’s deteriorating mental state as a main subject of the poem. Specifically, when the raven lands upon “a bust of Pallas” (VII.48), I interpreted this as an apparent symbol for the disintegration of the narrator’s sound state of mind; the correlation between the representation of death manifested in the for…[Read more]

  • Kaylin Parisi became a registered member 2 years, 7 months ago