Ronel Baccay

  • What’s considered justice and injustice? This may be an eternal problem that people in a democracy will always debate over. Laws aren’t stagnant, events and situations can change them for they are unique or may […]

    • I agree with you on how although the $100 fine may seem unreasonable, it is in fact a deterrent and a way to prevent people from even thinking of doing it. If we didn’t have these consequences set in place, how would these laws be enforced? It isn’t just for fare evasion, this goes for any crime from shoplifting, to drug use and even committing murder. People must know the consequences of doing these acts in order to think twice and fear the thought of doing it. With punishments come s thinking before acting, although a handful of people May still commit these crimes no matter what the punishment may be. To stop these people from performing these things in inevitable, and so they must face the consequences.

    • I agree 100% that the $100.00 fine for jumping the turnstile is a massive overkill for such a little incident. Yeah, I know jumping it is “wrong” in a sense, but the fact that the fares are going up over the years without any noticeable improvement to the MTA system is also wrong- maybe even more wrong. I find it more probable that if someone was jumping the turnstile it was for a moment of desperation to get home if you had no money on you to get a MetroCard, considering it is the city and all, everyone is rushing to get somewhere, and you can not really ask people for spare change without them thinking you are crazy or something. As fares go up and living wage continues to not even exist-especially for New York since the cost of living is so high- I find it a common scenario for something like this to happen. I see the big fine as just another way for the system to make money off of people in bad situations and/or the poor just for being poor.

  • Public Space is a fairly new characteristic of modern society. It had always been part of it, but the transition from a liberal to a post-liberal view has made public space a more political issue that affects a […]

    • I like how you brought up the question of whether heavy police presence in a public space like Times Square help people feel safe, or does it intimidate them? Just as the conversation we had in class about this idea, everyone has their own perspective and feels differently about these topic.

      • This goes back to the factor of race that plays a huge role in how people may perceive this additional militarization because some races, such as people of color dominantly face inequality.

  • I agree with your opinion, you did a good job at being informative for the readers and you brought up relevant facts. I’d like to see new/recent data for 2017 now that I think about it. The de Blasio plan is 3 years old now as well so there could be data somewhere reliable.

  • This was very informative and substantial. Only thing I’d recommend is to be more analytical with the trends in residential segregation and to also give context using certain events in the 19th century. The title isn’t really explored in the post but overall just a little more additions would make it more complete.

  • I appreciate the extra facts you provided, such as the spending on corporate and social welfare. I feel the same way as you upon finding out that welfare don’t really fare well. The thing that stuck to me was this sort of loop that’s created with people on benefits and how they’re worse off when taking a higher salary than minimum wage that pushes…[Read more]

  • Since it’s explosion in the 90s, the globalization & privatization of economic institutions across the world produced profound effects on economic instability, specifically in the U.S. A decline in corporate […]

    • I appreciated this blog post because it gave me a further understanding of this topic.I think you brought up a very interesting point on how companies can hire people in foreign countries to do their work for ten times less than what they would pay for it in America. This reminded me of sweatshops in foreign countries, with them frequently having health hazards and burning to the ground, including the one famously known in Bangladesh. The United States fixed the conditions of their factories (from Triangle Shirt waste fire), but owners of private businesses do not care about this set of values, they only care if they could get labor to make more money in the long run.

    • I agree with you 100 percent on the points you made on how globalization has many negative effects with the minimum wage not increasing and how companies hire workers in other countries do the work for much cheaper. These are definitely negative effects although, aren’t there some positive effects that come from globalization just as there are negative? An example may be in competition where companies have to lower prices to meet their competitor’s prices which benefits the consumer.

  • New York is a leading city in the culture of arts and fashion. One of the reasons is because many people from all over the world come here with hopes of pushing this culture forward. The emergence of immigrants as you stated in the blog and its correlation to the development of New York is still prevalent even today. The importance of immigrants…[Read more]

  • This is a very well-written blog post, straight to the point and easy to understand. I enjoyed the outside information you provided for the Walton family, I didn’t know some of the facts you stated about the family. The economic equality between the CEO of Walmart and its workers reveal just how uneven the distribution of wealth is. This also…[Read more]

  • Growing up I was always the type of person to have adult conversations with people as I understood more about society. I was fortunate enough to never experience poverty first-hand; living in New York and in a […]

  • Ronel Baccay became a registered member 2 years, 7 months ago