Rachel Olshin

  • This past semester at Full Frontal with Samantha Bee has really been incredible. It has been so exciting to be part of such an innovative, politically charged show during this election cycle, and to be with show as it grew into it’s voice. The cherry on top was that the people at Full Frontal are so kind and generous with their knowledge, always o…[Read more]

  • Since I am graduating in the spring, this internship has been very important for my potential career in production. Working at Full Frontal with Samantha Bee is really like a dream internship, everyone is really friendly and open, and it’s such an exciting show and time to work on it. It is only a fall internship, and even though I believe they a…[Read more]

  • I work for the political satire show, Full Frontal with Samantha Bee (http://samanthabee.com/). The show is a half hour and broadcasted weekly, it examines and lampoons the political and societal hypocrisies of our day. I am a production intern that works specifically in the post-production department. My primarily responsibilities are…[Read more]

  • I work for the political satire show, Full Frontal with Samantha Bee (http://samanthabee.com/). The show is a half hour and broadcasted weekly, it examines and lampoons the political and societal hypocrisies of our day. I am a production intern that works specifically in the post-production department. My primarily responsibilities are…[Read more]

  • Interesting question about the smudges. I do not see them as a loss of identity, but an inability to truly pinpoint the American identity. I think it is more of an inability to express the new American identity then it is a loss of one. It is the mark when words fail.

  • I think the most powerful aspect about the poem is it’s ability to mean nothing, and mean everything at the same time. Steven said that he saw nothing and could not find a deeper connection, and perhaps that is the point. Perelman is able to take a straight forward sentence and end it with propositional phrases, giving this reader a sense of…[Read more]

  • In “North American Time” I found that Rich was not so much saying that changing words from the original meaning is bad, but rather that words written by a poet can be criticized or scrutinized by a people that wish to oversimplify the art. When Rich writes “Everything we write will be used against us”, she is alluding to the fact that her art…[Read more]

  • In Diving into the Wreck, Rich describes destruction as deep-sea wreckage, something that she ambivalently explores. The persona is both curious by the wreck and fears it, feeling that it is her mission to explore […]

    • Yes! loving the cynicism. The extended metaphor is laid out too neatly. Besides, I’ve been scuba diving. You feel so alive and at one with nature there’s no way during those moments anyone is feeling depressed (but that’s a technicality). Everything in this poem is too easy. Furthermore, on a note of personal taste, I found the beginning of her preparations excruciating, and I felt it anyway did not add to the message she was trying to convey.

    • In my opinion, it is not that Rich is not being sincere as much as she is somewhat inconsistent. As I read this, I found myself lost towards the last stanza when the pronouns in its first line, “We are, I am, you are,” were introduced. Not only then, but also the pronouns in the line “I am she: I am he” leave me utterly confused. The reference to the mermaid could be an allusion to the actual wreckage which is an interesting comparison. At first I thought, ships are usually referred to as women, and so that could be the reason, but the his then left me in internal conflict. Anyways, my point was that as Rich progresses deeper into the poem, the actual “Wreck” that the title probably refers to is being described whereas the initial stanzas presented more of that adrenaline rush that Yoni refers to. I have no sure opinion of these random pronouns, but since the Wreck is somewhat rushed, the pronouns could be a short way of putting all the lives maybe lost from that wreckage of maybe some ship into perspective. That, however, is a really far-fetched claim so who knows.

    • I think that the purpose of laying everything out so neatly was that she wants the readers to understand that she as an author, as a person of the present, is going down to experience firsthand a thing of the past. Yes, in a way it seems like she is trying too hard, but she is also trying to explain the transition from past to present, from merely observing to experiencing.

  • Like most people commented I didn’t know exactly what the words mean. I do notice however that the word “Time” is uppercase, and when Ginsberg refers to “o the rhythm of thought in his naked and endless head” the he is Time. In some ways Ginsberg is lamenting the fact that time exists, and while time itself is endless, Ginsberg’s time on earth is…[Read more]

  • “who chained themselves to subways for the endless ride from Battery to holy Bronx on benzedrine until the noise of wheels and children brought them down shuddering mouth-wracked and battered bleak of brain all drained of brilliance in the drear light of Zoo,”
    When I read this I wonder if Ginsberg is criticizing the drug use…[Read more]

  • I have a slightly different reading. I think O’Hara purposefully chooses to write about the mundane, the daily routines, in order to emphasize the shock and feeling of loss that he (and perhaps some of his friends) felt upon discovering Holiday’s death. O’Hara starts off the poem with it being a typical day in his life, he does not even mention…[Read more]

  • I agree with the comments bellow: I think that using a female pronoun for America, is a societal convention. The homeland is associated with the females because they that tend traditionally would tend to the home. Still, the question is very interesting. Women and mothers specifically (i.e. the phrase “motherland”) is traditionally considered to…[Read more]

  • I agree with the comments bellow: I think that using a female pronoun for America, is a societal convention. The homeland is associated with the females because they that tend traditionally would tend to the home. Still, the question is very interesting. Women and mothers specifically (i.e. the phrase “motherland”) is traditionally considered to…[Read more]

  • I took the repetition as more of a visceral reaction to Picasso’s art, rather than a trepidation to be in his presence. Picasso seems like a peer of Stein’s, and being that she was a “self-proclaimed genius” (biography in the readings), I do not picture her as the “fan-girl” type who gets easily frazzled by a talented artist. I think it has more…[Read more]

  • I really like the idea that the “they” is actually an extension of the persona, and that the persona is choosing to isolate his/herself. I think it makes a lot of sense, especially in light of what we discussed in class about the self in “they shut me up in a box” and the self in “No more then I”, being two different entities. Compared to Whitman,…[Read more]

  • Rachel Olshin became a registered member 2 years, 9 months ago