Ravenn Haynes

  • What are you doing to finalize your preparation for the exam?

    I am going to finish reading the last bit of texts and annotate them as much as possible. I am also going to re-read the theories and […]

    • This all sounds reasonable. To relax, you’ll want to be orderly about your work this week, and to make sure to get good rest the night before. Remember that you’ll have the texts and your annotations in the exam setting. The key thing is to be able to say something specific about the texts you use. Since these are exam answers (rather than papers), the exam writing will be rougher than what we did for the thesis paper.

  • Personification is the act of giving animals, objects, or even ideas, “human” qualities. This notion is closely related to the pathetic fallacy where the natural phenomena has been denoted the attributes of hum […]

    • This starts off strong with a clear definition and application to Albee. The Donne example doesn’t seem quite like it is personification: his seduction depends on the flea remaining a lowly flea. It’s not as though the flea is given human attributes or seen to have feelings. The flea’s creatureliness is what the metaphor counts on. But, because you provided a clear definition in the beginning, this would still hold for a honor’s exam response.

  • An unreliable narrator can affect the reader’s understanding of a love plot in several ways. There can be moments of what psychoanalysts might call projection or displacement. Other narrative moments might s […]

    • This starts out well with a clear account of the term and its implications. You might also highlight how the unreliable narrator’s bias forces the reader to try to read the text more scrupulously, filtering our the predispositions of the narrator.

      It seems that you ran out of time, though. In the exam, you could return to this to flesh out the remainder of the response. While the response on Wuthering Heights is detailed, a few choice quotations would round this out and make it more detailed. In a crunch, just including a line or two about how you would develop the Gatsby text at the end would also help us see better the direction that your ideas were moving in.

  • Leo Bersani and Adam Phillips examine the notion of “impersonal intimacies” in the chapter, “The It and the I” from their book Intimacies.  This chapter discusses the potential for a relationship to exist without […]

    • This opens with a nice account of Bersani and Phillips. The examples that you chose don’t quite map on to the theory though. Bersani and Phillips write about IMPERSONAL intimacy, and these relationships form the text you chose are highly personal. In addition to the impersonality and the absence of sex, you’d also want to mention how the impersonal account allows for the surfacing of some potential in one or both members of the relationships.

  • 1. This week, I am working on my introduction. By this, I not only mean the first few pages that set up my argument, but I am working on the very first paragraph. My peers have expressed that there is no “hook” […]

  • Writing my thesis for this course has proven to be beyond difficult. With hardly any time last semester, I wasn’t able to write as frequently as I had hoped, let alone conjure any pliable thought that was worth […]

    • While I have only read the first four pages of your paper, Raven, I think you are headed in the right direction. I am glad last class’s workshop helped you to feel inspired again. I can’t wait to see the finished product. Good Luck!

    • Ravenn, if your paper is going to sound anything like this reflection, I feel like you’re going to be in a good place. Without a doubt, you do have a strong voice, and I’m sure you’ll find a way to make it come through in your paper! I’m glad that you’ve found your inspiration again. Sounds like you’re past the worst of it all now.

  • Poetry serves many purposes in our every day life. It is the song that you listen to in the morning that makes you feel like something special, it is the words on a love note that you send to your beloved when […]

  • For my final paper, I would like to use a metaphysical approach to explore the connection between Catherine and Heathcliff in Wuthering Heights as a direct mirror of their destructive environment and how this in […]

    • We discussed this in person already, so I’ll await your revised proposal/ bibliography.

  • Ravenn Haynes commented on the page, on the site Bad Romance Blog 1 year, 1 month ago

    Bryan –

    That is another great way to interpret the meaning of love in this story. It’s short but rich analysis and interpretation.

  • Ravenn Haynes commented on the page, on the site Bad Romance Blog 1 year, 1 month ago

    Avi,

    This is a great and rather in depth analysis of Abraham’s relationship with someone other than his first wive, and the discord created within the family thereafter. However, the premise of my argument was that Harjo’s conversion wasn’t deemed unworthy even though he was likened to Abraham. There were many reasons as you pointed out. I…[Read more]

  • Ravenn Haynes commented on the page, on the site Bad Romance Blog 1 year, 1 month ago

    I was thinking of using Talia Schaffer to help guide me through this process. Since I was really captivated by her argument regarding Catherine’s love for Heathcliff and Edgar being spiritual/emotional and social, respectively, I would further delve into that discussion and extract why exactly that was, pinpointing moments throughout the book that…[Read more]

  • Ravenn Haynes commented on the page, on the site Bad Romance Blog 1 year, 1 month ago

    That’s a great suggestion. I was thinking of somehow connect WH to modern work. Thank you Deja!

  • Upon reading “The Problem of Old Harjo” by John M. Oskison, I began asking myself if this work really added to the Romance genre. Given everything that was discussed in class, this story is not as obvious in the […]

    • Avi,

      This is a great and rather in depth analysis of Abraham’s relationship with someone other than his first wive, and the discord created within the family thereafter. However, the premise of my argument was that Harjo’s conversion wasn’t deemed unworthy even though he was likened to Abraham. There were many reasons as you pointed out. I guess what I intended was that there needed be an act of love regarded his conversion despite his previous decisions, and his love for his wives regardless of his faith. Does that make sense, or did I butcher my interpretation again?

    • Bryan –

      That is another great way to interpret the meaning of love in this story. It’s short but rich analysis and interpretation.

  • This part of the semester is particularly hard because I have to discuss in detail a topic and text of my choice. While there are many other papers that I would like to expand upon, I think I am going to write […]

    • Would you be interested in drawing parallels between Wuthering Heights and vampire diaries? You could explain how the works share similar couple dynamics. (Just a suggestion to make things more fun 🙂 )

    • I was thinking of using Talia Schaffer to help guide me through this process. Since I was really captivated by her argument regarding Catherine’s love for Heathcliff and Edgar being spiritual/emotional and social, respectively, I would further delve into that discussion and extract why exactly that was, pinpointing moments throughout the book that support this. Also using the concept of the role of death in eros, this would explain Catherine’s death on many levels and Heathcliff’s death both metaphorical and realistically on many levels. Or am I missing your point completely?

  • Ravenn Haynes commented on the page, on the site Deja's Mind Junk 1 year, 1 month ago

    Deja,

    This is exactly why I don’t think Heathcliff is as bad as everyone thinks he is. He has been through a lot, however, this is not to dismiss the fact that he has his douche-baggy moments throughout the novel. But, his love for Catherine makes him soft indeed. When she rejected him, as any person would, he lashed out and said harsh things.…[Read more]

  • The Wife of Bath’s Prologue in Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, is an iconic work of feminism. Alison, is a woman of resilience, strength, sass, and virtue. She embodies feminism in every way possible. She […]

  • Bryan,

    I don’t think that you are wrong at all. Actually, I agree with the connection you made between Shelley’s “Ozymandias” and Blanchot’s “The Writing of the Disaster”. And quite frankly, I don’t know how I missed it. The “disaster” can be either something as definitive as love, or it can be the aftermath of one’s experience of love. This…[Read more]

  • The Writing of the Disaster by Maurice Blanchot is a confusing piece. Reading through it, I wasn’t quite sure what to call “disaster”. It still remains nameless.  However, I can’t help but wonder, is”disaster” i […]

    • Ravenn,

      I begin by confessing that I, too, had a difficult time reading Blanchot’s work. Having said that however, I do not believe your interpretation is, as you at times suggest, entirely wrong. “Love,” among other subjects, can easily stand in for the “disaster” and I believe this is what Blanchot is trying to suggest with “the disaster has already passed beyond danger, even when we are under the threat of –––––” (4). The ––––– seems to provide a space for specificity all the while denoting some sort of universality, which made me share your observation of a latent contradiction. Indeed, at one point I thought the purpose of the text was to have the reader experience “disaster” in its many forms especially after reading “the fragmentary promises not instability (the opposite of fixity) so much as disarray, confusion” (7). I tied this last citation with Shelley’s “Ozymandias” and thought maybe Blanchot is proposing that we, after a “disaster,” are left as scattered and chaotic as the statue of Ozymandias despite our insistence of preserving the words engraved on our pedestal.

      Of course, I can be totally off and so for that I apologize in advance as well as thank you for enduring my analysis.

      • Bryan,

        I don’t think that you are wrong at all. Actually, I agree with the connection you made between Shelley’s “Ozymandias” and Blanchot’s “The Writing of the Disaster”. And quite frankly, I don’t know how I missed it. The “disaster” can be either something as definitive as love, or it can be the aftermath of one’s experience of love. This analysis can certainly be a representative of the “scattered and chaotic” as you put it. This piece definitely has many layers to it.

    • Blanchot’s reading left me confused and unsure of what the meaning behind his work is, but I think what I took away from it is that disasters, whether they be natural or man-made, are not recognized as disasters in the moment that they occur, but we recognize them as such in hindsight when we have time to process what happened to us; it’s weird though because we know that disasters are inevitable, or rather Blanchot knows this, because he writes that “the disaster is its imminence, but since the future, as we conceive of it in the order of lived time, belongs to the disaster, the disaster has always already withdrawn or dissuaded it”. The word “imminence” in this quote means “the state or fact of being about to happen”, so that is what I meant when I wrote that Blanchot knows that disasters are inevitable. We can look to the past to reflect disasters, and assume that disasters will happen in the future.

      I am not sure if the disaster that Blanchot refers to is love, but love can certainly be disastrous. If the disaster is love, then maybe Blanchot’s writing is not just about the imminence of disaster (love), but also how to deal with love when love becomes disastrous? He writes “it is not you who will speak; let the disaster speak in you, even if it be by your forgetfulness or silence”. Maybe what he is saying in regard to love in this quote is that the trauma of disaster (or love gone wrong) speaks through us in the way we interact with others in the future, kind of like post-traumatic stress disorder. I feel like I am rambling at this point; I did not make the connection of disaster to love until I read your post but I thought what you wrote is insightful and it has me rethinking what I thought I understood about this reading.

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  • First off, Persepolis 1 is a fantastic graphic novel, that is intriguing in both words and illustration. Marjane Satrapi definitely took a medium that is usually used for light stories, and told a story of growth […]

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