Tabish29

  • Tabish29 commented on the page, on the site Superhero 9 months ago

    Very good observations Jose.
    Like our readings last week, your questions raise more questions and an ever continuing discourse.
    “Thus, the origin of one of Hank’s so-called superpowers is a humorous riff on the serious phenomenon of race as a visible entity, or race as empowering or disempowering” (94).
    I laughed a…[Read more]

  • Tabish29 commented on the page, on the site Superhero 9 months, 1 week ago

    Well written as usual Phil. I like the questions you raise in your analysis, as well as Kent’s.

    1.) Are comics like Ms. Marvel and Miss America simply created to pander and generate $$$? Or are they as important as we want them to be? Or both?

    You have reason for your cynicism. Definitely some market research/demographic survey went into…[Read more]

  • Tabish29 commented on the page, on the site Superhero 9 months, 2 weeks ago

    Well written piece Monica. I’m going to try to address the question you posed,

    “Bramlett defines Superman exposure to solar radiation as “life-changing trauma” (5). By following Bramlett’s logic, why do you think Superman maintains his standard quotidian the same except him telling Lois his connection with his alter-ego? If that is consi…[Read more]

  • Tabish29 commented on the page, on the site Superhero 9 months, 3 weeks ago

    OMG. I was actually thinking of giving him a Superhero name today. I swear to God!! yes absolutely. Do you think he will give us creative control?

  • Tabish29 commented on the page, on the site Superhero 9 months, 3 weeks ago

    Thank You.
    Thank You.
    Thank You.
    Thank You.
    You are the greatest Superhero Professor.

  • Tabish29 commented on the page, on the site Superhero 9 months, 3 weeks ago

    “Throughout the narrative the marvels constantly function to interfere with American national consciousness through the intrusion of that which is larger than consciousness. This manifests itself as the loss of innocence, the American fall from grace in the 1970s when Vietnam forced America to confront its own national failure fully”(Carney…[Read more]

  • Tabish29 commented on the page, on the site Superhero 10 months ago

    I like that they’re just as messed up as me. Hopefully more. Gives me hope. I like your response. It’s riddled with realistic grit.

  • The Watchmen as Literature. Or not.

    According to Hoberek, “..non verbal elements of the graphic novel complicate a definition of Literature formulated with reference to print fiction, or how popular or j […]

    • Hey Tabish, great work. Watchmen is always so fun to discuss because of its complexity. I’d like to address your 4th question:

      Does Watchmen’s narrative, both script wise and art wise, which is steeped in realism, make you uncomfortable in seeing hero’s who are overweight, impotent and coming face to face with their mortality just as people do everyday? Would you have preferred a more stylized approach as Frank Miller deployed in TDKR?

      I think that the ‘realism’ you describe, ie: fat, fatigued, hesitant, impotent, moody, angry, etc., is what makes Watchmen so enduring. The reduction and realization of these, for lack of a better word, ‘shitty’ superheroes makes them more real, less “super.” This creates a space for readers to relate to them as people, and not idolize them as gods. In fact, Dr. Manhattan, the only true super character of the book is the least relatable because he exists so far outside of this realm of ‘reality.’
      So, no, I don’t feel uncomfortable. I feel hypercomfortable. Maybe even in a problematic or troubling way.

    • To answer question 2, I don’t think that Watchmen should be considered literature. That said, its serialized nature doesn’t bother me-Twain and Dickens were both authors who had their novels appear in newspapers a chapter at a time in the 19th century and they are certainly writers of “literature.” Nor do I think the creation -by-committee/assembly line nature of it disqualifies it either, since most modern literature has gone through numerous revisions between author and editor and publisher before its final draft makes it to the reader. If we consider the artwork, does the inclusion of graphics negate legitimate works of children’s literature that include pictorials, or Blake’s engravings made specifically for Songs of Innocence and Songs of Experience? I don’t believe any of those arguments hold water as disqualifiers for literature. Yet I still don’t think Watchmen is literature for most of the same reasons that Hoberek argues in the article.
      Here’s what I do think. I believe that Watchmen, TDKR, and Maus are the ground zero for a thesis demanding that the comic book/graphic novel be acknowledged as Art. It may not be High Art in the same sense that we revere Beethoven or Joyce or Goya but it seems that in the format it inhabits, we must now consider the three works listed above as the template for how comic books can be artistic experiences. They transcend expectations of their form and genre yet are firmly rooted in such and so inculcate conventions of literature, photography, cinema, and illustration into a new organism that henceforth may only be analyzed and criticized as a comic book. A cinematic, photographic, or literary critique alone of the material is no longer sufficient-the academic critic must now demonstrate an understanding of the medium at a level equal to a musicologist deconstructing Bach or Charlie Parker. In short, Watchmen forces the reader to ingest the comic book reading as its own unique artistic experience.

    • Awesome job, Tabish!

      Does Watchmen’s narrative, both script wise and art wise, which is steeped in realism, make you uncomfortable in seeing hero’s who are overweight, impotent and coming face to face with their mortality just as people do everyday? Would you have preferred a more stylized approach as Frank Miller deployed in TDKR?

      I thought I would be relieved as a none comic book fan to read the Watchmen, having heard its not your “typical” superhero story.  In some way I found Watchmen to be the best read thus far, however it made me very uncomfortable.  The gritty realisim, the dark subplots, and just the overall terrible people running the show here was both refreshing and distrubing. I think fans would argue that was Moore`s intent.  Readers are faced with psycopaths like Rorchach and the brutal Comedian, who with no special powers, are our superheroes, and he we root for them! Why? Rorschach is probably the most irattionaly violent character we have seen so far and although I wouldnt say he is your typical American man – I know more people like Rorschach than Superman.  We all do.

      The Watchmen brings to light that we dont really want superheros governing over us, they’re  just masked killers, we only like the idea of being a Superman or Wonderwoman. Moore shows us why we shouldnt want to be superheroes – look they’re just as messed up as you! (Hopefully more so.)

      • I like that they’re just as messed up as me. Hopefully more. Gives me hope. I like your response. It’s riddled with realistic grit.

  • Tabish29 commented on the page, on the site Superhero 10 months, 2 weeks ago

    Thats funny but what is Denny saying then? That he would have more of a chance in a gay relationship than he does with women?

  • Tabish29 commented on the page, on the site Superhero 10 months, 2 weeks ago

    I agree. Also if you read Sin City you’ll see Miller appears highly misogynistic and there are no heroines in it..rather, female anti-heroes. So you are right that in Miller’s case, he can’t depict a heroine without overly sexualizing her. I’m thinking Elektra although she’s a villain/anti-hero(ine).

  • Tabish29 commented on the page, on the site Superhero 10 months, 2 weeks ago

    Thanks for asking that question Maria…Question # 1 to be exact.

    I must admit I am not a 100% on the definition of a “misreading”. Is Bloom/Klock saying it means to read it in and of itself detaching any relevance to its analogy yet retaining its original canonical components? if so, then I agree with him that Miller did perform a misreading…[Read more]

  • Tabish29 commented on the page, on the site Superhero 10 months, 3 weeks ago

    Hi Todd. My two pence…

    The GL-GA series was ahead of its time for tackling social issues regarding race and politics. I’m the type that likes to bring up more questions and I like any analysis that comes off it. Just going to mention some points here that you touched upon.

    As far as the introduction of John Stewart…it is not Jordan who…[Read more]

  • Tabish29 commented on the page, on the site Superhero 11 months ago

    The first quote in your 1st question was regarding the “immortality” of manipulating Jean….I got to thinking on that for a while and decided to look it up on pg 220 of Fawwaz’s essay. It is the “IMMORALITY” of manipulating Jean…BUT…going along YOUR exact words(immortality), I can still see a relevance in that, as in, a moral decay in society…[Read more]

  • Tabish29 commented on the page, on the site Superhero 11 months, 1 week ago

    Very good post and the questions mirrored my own . Deconstructing WW certainly raises more questions to which there are more questions than answers (Deconstruction is loopy like that in my head). Saunders points out that the company were confused as to WW’s target audience. I think to understand that we have to figure out Marston better. He’s…[Read more]

  • Tabish29 commented on the page, on the site Superhero 11 months, 2 weeks ago

    Ironically, going along Eco’s comments of elapsed time or time continuum, when he says time elapses only within an issue but not between issues…in the first appearance cliffhanger in June 1938, issue # 2 picks up where 1 had left off. but the subsequent issues are one shot tales. So I’m calling some bilk on Eco’s theories here. As a young reader…[Read more]

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