tracy

  • So for the exam I was looking at two texts for each category.

    Theory:

    Affect (Brennan)

    -The Mark on the Wall

    -The Yellow Wallpaper

     

    Historical Context:

    19th Century

    -Dickinson […]

  • what about “cognitive conscious kinesis”

    I’m trying to get at the movement of thoughts between people and trying to make it sound cool but also educated, thoughts?

    OR

    “Cognitive Kinesis”

  • Mine is about the transcendence of race in contemporary America.

  • A midnight summers dream consists of connecting plots that are joined by the wedding celebration of the Duke Theseus of Athens and the Amazon queen, Hippolyta,

    The play revolves around four lovers who become […]

  • Main Takeaway from Homi Bhabha:

    Interested in:

    How can we understand post colonial culture?

    We should conceive of a persons identity and how it effects theories of post colonial culture

    Bhabha argues […]

  • Hey! I really like your first dash! I think I’m going to incorporate something similar to my essay now that I read yours. I think it’s a really good idea. Overall you have a good list from the last draft that I’ve seen. I think your paper will turn out amazingly!

  • Hey! I think you have a really good checklist here and it’s very doable. Your thesis– from the last time i saw it– needed to be a bit clearer because it sort of changes throughout the paper. I thought your stance was clear, actually, but maybe it’s because I’m using what you’ve told me about your paper as a mode of understanding your stance.…[Read more]

  • List of Revisions

    Focus in on Coates
    Add a review of each of the books
    Tie in secondary works i.e. Baldwin and Richard Wright
    Integrate the black bodies within both texts
    Add in my personal […]

    • This is a good list. I would suggest, with number 1, that you start by writing a solid paragraph or two focusing on both texts.

      You’ve mentioned the fact that because your works are so contemporary, you don’t have criticism to draw on. Drawing on influences like Wright and Baldwin is a great idea. Are there any others?

      You should probably also discuss some of the most prominent reviews of both books–and public statements Coates and Rankine have made about their work (when they’ve won awards, for example).

  • Tracy Kawall

    Professor Jason Tougaw

    Senior Seminar

    2-5-17

    Presentation

    Author of Primary Text: Emily Dickinson

    Poems: “I Felt a Funeral in My Brain,” “The Brain is Wider than the Sky,” “Tell A […]

  • Ok, so I know I was supposed to post this paragraph an extremely long time ago, but here it is LOL.

    My intention for this ballroom diagram was to sort of stand on the shoulders of Rankine and Coats because they do have similar views about racism, however they talk about it in two really different ways. Rankine chooses to express her frustration…[Read more]

    • Ok, so I know I was supposed to post this paragraph an extremely long time ago, but here it is LOL.

      My intention for this ballroom diagram was to sort of stand on the shoulders of Rankine and Coats because they do have similar views about racism, however they talk about it in two really different ways. Rankine chooses to express her frustration of racism with a lyric where as Coats chooses a letter to his son. They both feel like racism still exists in many forms but differ depending on gender. Yancy’s piece is on raced bodies and how even though we may think we’re in a colorblind society, we’re really not and there’s no escaping the truth, for this source I was going to use the strategy of ass-kissing. For coopers article, I also wanted to use the strategy of ass kissing. She reports on an incident that happened on a wine tour which is considered a “white space.” Cooper goes on to discuss what happened when blacks are forced to realize what really happens when you’re in a white space. The next source is another book by George Yancy, Black Bodies, White Gazes: The Continuing Significance. He talks about the significance of what a “white gaze” is and also what that means for blacks in the society, again, my strategy is ass-kissing. These sources all fit together in a strange way because even though it may not seem like one has anything to do with the other, everything kind of overlaps. It’s extremely difficult to talk about race and racism because it’s been done so many times that I find it hard to bring to light a new perspective, but I’m going to try to really unpack what both my primary works have to do with the new movements against racism in America.

  • SO, for the proposal I think you picked an awesome book to write about. Would it help to possible think about how other factors of the book may make our judgment of the incest so horrible? Yeah I know everyones gonna say “incest is incest and its bad anywhere” blah blah blah…BUT I think the fact that the incest took place in an Indian family had…[Read more]

  • What feedback do I give here? LOL. Your sources seem to fit your idea of what you want to talk about perfectly. Your sources all have to do with the depiction of women in general in the book…only cause you mentioned it in your proposal…would it help to find a source that deals with radicalized gender in the novel? I don’t know if a source like…[Read more]

  • Hey,
    So I really like the idea you’re working with here. Your focus is gender in the novel, but do you think its worth looking at a secondary source to see if race has anything to do with that portrayal of women? I’m working on Coats and his book is male dominated as well, I haven’t found any material to answer the question of “why” are there no…[Read more]

  • I have a bunch more possible sources that I want to look at, but this is all I got through reading since some of this material is realllllly dense. I’m currently looking for something directly stated about either of my two primary sources that aren’t just praising the books but looking at it critically. It’s kinda difficult because they’re both…[Read more]

  • Annotated Bibliography

    Coates, Ta-Nehisi. Between the World and Me. N.p.: Spiegel & Grau, 2015. Print.

    Between the World and Me by Coats provides a first hand look at how racism is dealt with by a black man. […]

    • I have a bunch more possible sources that I want to look at, but this is all I got through reading since some of this material is realllllly dense. I’m currently looking for something directly stated about either of my two primary sources that aren’t just praising the books but looking at it critically. It’s kinda difficult because they’re both fairly new books, but I’m SLOWLY making progress.. thanks guys!

    • I don’t really know what feedback I can give you, because it seems that you are narrowing down your research focus. The sources you mentioned seem really interesting and pertinent to the conversation you are trying to insert yourself into.

      I noticed in your comment that you said you can’t find any reviews of the book that aren’t critical. This reminded me of an article I read in buzzfeed a couple months ago, that critiqued Coate’s preoccupation with black men, which completely disregarded that the black experience encompasses women as well. I know buzzfeed isn’t a “critical source” but she makes really good arguments! I found the article: https://www.buzzfeed.com/shani/between-the-world-and-she?utm_term=.qamLb380Pn#.slmEPjmb7Y
      I hope this is helpful!

  • For my project I’m thinking about using several different primary sources. One of the books I was considering using was Invisible Man by Ellison. The book focuses on a man that is considered invisible because he […]

    • I can definitely see where you’re going with this and made me think of a great contributor to your proposal, Jane Elliot. She’s an American anti-racism activist, educator, public speaker, feminist, and LGBT activist. She goes as far as someone’s eye color. I highly suggest looking into her work.

    • I think that as a general field of inquiry you have identified your aims well. From what I understand, you intend to research how racism works as a learned process (not innate) and how the two books you mentioned as primary sources, portray the effects of racism psychologically? I think that maybe through finding more secondary sources you can narrow your research question further. I think that because you are using two primary sources you should explain the connection you see between the two. For example, there are multiple books which tackle the topic of race and racism, why specifically have you chosen Ellison and Coates’ texts? What ways do these novels approach race and racism differently or similarly? Do they both represent the psychological effects of racism in the same way? I think you have already identified one connection in your first paragraph, where you state that Ellison creates a character who feels he is rendered invisible by his race, however Coates is preoccupied with the hypervisibility of the black body in our current moment. You can speak about the manifestations of each novel’s depiction of racial consciousness being affected by the author’s historical moment. Also can the differences within each book’s critique of racism be attributed to genre, given that Ellison’s work is fiction, while Coate’s memoir is non-fiction? Do you intend to use a specific theoretical framework to analyze the ways race/racism is portrayed in each text? Overall, I think that you have to identify what each novel says about race/racism that you find significant.

      P.S. I read a few chapters of Barbara and Karen Field’s book ‘Racecraft’ which might be useful to you in your research, given that they speak about a lot of the ideas you mention about racism.

    • I think you have a good idea of what you’re interested in, but that it will need to be more narrowly defined for this project. Especially because of how you mentioned being worried about everything on this topic having been discussed already. I also have a wide topic and I worry about spending too much of the paper giving historical context and not enough on the primary texts.

      Following up on what Professor Tougaw mentioned in class last week, and Krystal’s suggestions, I think picking one manifestation of racism, that’s present in both books is good a place to start. I haven’t read Coates’ book, but it sounds likely the actions of the police against black bodies would be a part of it. That could tie in well with the issue of police brutality in Invisible Man. This might even relate to that Times article you mentioned in class?

      I liked how you were specific in saying how Coates’ book combats the idea of invisibility. Again, going off of Krystal’s suggestion about focusing on fiction versus memoir, ask questions about what the genre change implies. Maybe you’re interested in how fiction allows Ellison the ability to be invisible and hidden when he chooses, compared to the unavoidable visibility in Coates’ non-fiction book. And what it means that Ellison says at the end of the book that he knows he can’t stay that way forever. Also the more surreal elements of the book, like the way Ellison narrates a few chapters like dream sequences even when they’re not dreams (I don’t know if that relates to Coates’ book though).

      If you take the comparative approach, you can better know what other secondary sources you need, as in do you want to reconcile differences between Ellison and Coates’ views, or agree/disagree with something they both do the same? I don’t think there’s any lack of critique on the works you chose, but that doesn’t mean there’s nothing to contribute. I think the direction will be clearer once you decide which of the Gaipa strategies you’ll use to engage other work on the topic.

  • So, even after the discussion I’m still really confused about this work…not that the plot or what is going on is confusing but that I think that everything is pretty much as is and I kinda of take it at face val […]

  • So I’m most interested in the point you made, “I have heard, relentlessly, of the trope that a woman caused the destruction of man kind.” This is a point that I’m glad you brought up. I’m also glad that you mentioned the whole Adam and Eve thing. I think this trope stems from the Bible and the story of Adam and Eve itself. The story is basically…[Read more]

  • tracy commented on the page, on the site Kelly's Writing 5 years ago

    Your post made me think of the color of green symbolizing envy. This would kind of fit into our discussion from class because Sir Gawain was the hero that was able to not be a hero… if that makes sense. He wasn’t the most macho or clever of hero’s which maybe could lead to the envy that people felt about him…I’m pretty sure that Sir Gawain was…[Read more]

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