worchard

  • worchard posted a new page, on the site BAD ROMANCE 2 weeks, 6 days ago

     

    Andre Aciman, Call Me By Your Name

    Phoebe Gloeckner, Diary of a Teenage Girl

    Phoebe Gloeckner, A Child’s Life and Other Stories

    Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Blithedale Romance

    Imitation of Life (dir […]

  • worchard commented on the page, on the site Bad Romance Blog 3 weeks, 4 days ago

    We discussed this in person already, so I’ll await your revised proposal/ bibliography.

  • worchard commented on the page, on the site Deja's Mind Junk 1 month, 2 weeks ago

    I would probably focus on just one film, and recommend Blue is the Warmest Color over Love. Love would get mired in questions about the representation of sex, while Blue is the Warmest Color is a rich work that could also incorporate a transmedia analysis if you compared the graphic novel with the film adaptation. What we need here still, though,…[Read more]

  • worchard posted a new page, on the site BAD ROMANCE 3 months, 2 weeks ago

    August 29/30: The Trouble with Love

    Laura Kipnis, Against Love: A Polemic (2003)
    Alice Munro, “At the Jack Randa Hotel” (1994)
    Jhumpa Lahiri, “A Temporary Matter” (1999)

     September 5/6: Dialogue […]

  • 2017 English MA Conference Schedule
    Thursday, April 27, 2017
    James Muyskens Conference Room at the Summit Apartments
     

    9:30 – 10:00     Welcome and Coffee

    10:00 – 10:15     Opening Remarks

    Professor […]

  • 10:00 – 10:30   Welcome and Coffee (President’s Conference Room 2, Rosenthal Library, 5th floor)

    10:30 – 11:00    Opening Remarks

    11:00 – 12:10    Panel 1: Unstable Bodies, Chair: Talia Schaffer

    Elaine Ho […]

  • worchard wrote a new post, Call for Papers, on the site Other/wise 2 years, 9 months ago

    The Second Annual Queens College English Graduate Conference CFP
     
    OTHER/WISE:
    CONTESTING KNOWLEDGES, INVENTING CULTURES
    Conference Date: Wednesday, April 1, 2015
    Keynote Speaker: Jonathan Gray, Associate […]

  • worchard commented on the page, on the site Writing About Literature 3 years ago

    arturo:

    Rhode Montijo’s “T-t-t-tartamudo” contains a tension between the visual and textual narrative, this tension evokes an emotion once finishing the story due to the different things that occur in the text and in the images. The text contains instruction given by the boatman on how to meet the elder, and then instructions provided by the e…[Read more]

  • worchard commented on the page, on the site Writing About Literature 3 years ago

    Brendan H:

    The difference between what the texts portray to the reader and what the images tell is astounding. The text and the pictures seem to be in sync at the beginning- when the young boy is being ferried to the island, the images give off the same story, and it seems a bit unnecessary that the visual narratives exist at some point…[Read more]

  • worchard commented on the page, on the site Writing About Literature 3 years ago

    Ari’s post:
    I really found it interesting how Rhode Montijo’s “T-t-t-tartamudo” had two different stories (three if you count the speech bubbles in the illustrations) happening at the same time. The narrative is what you are meant to think is happening and the pictures seem to match until the end when you realize that the boy gave up his one c…[Read more]

  • Write a short (250-300 word) entry that explain the difference between the visual and textual narratives in Rhode Montijo’s “T-t-t-tartamudo.”   How does each tell a different story?  What does the tension between […]

    • Ari’s post:
      I really found it interesting how Rhode Montijo’s “T-t-t-tartamudo” had two different stories (three if you count the speech bubbles in the illustrations) happening at the same time. The narrative is what you are meant to think is happening and the pictures seem to match until the end when you realize that the boy gave up his one chance for a cure in order to help others. When I first read the story I thought that the boy had saved the children but also had managed to get the cure. I was really surprised by the outcome since the narrator keeps giving instructions as if they are being followed. I think it was very effective at least for me, and I felt sad for the boy, more so than I would have had I known immediately that he had not followed the instructions. Had it not been for the pictures the story would have been totally different. We would not have known that there were captive children and would have assumed it was simply a folktale about a young boy seeking a cure. The pictures paint a darker story and help to invoke not only sympathy and sadness for the boy, but a feeling of pride at what he has done and at the cost for his actions. There is also a feeling of hope at the end that because of his actions, the boy will be accepted even with he stutters.

    • Brendan H:

      The difference between what the texts portray to the reader and what the images tell is astounding. The text and the pictures seem to be in sync at the beginning- when the young boy is being ferried to the island, the images give off the same story, and it seems a bit unnecessary that the visual narratives exist at some point because it is like telling the same story twice, like seeing a picture of someone sleeping with the caption ‘I am asleep’. However, when the plot thickens- and the characters embark on the journey to correct the boy’s speech by following the Elder’s instructions, the tension is evident. It seems apparent that the kid’s speech is not corrected because he and his grandma decide to rescue other children from the prison of the hag’s tree instead of taking the cicada. Then the visual narrative becomes important because it is the only thing that gives us some evidence to deduce this: the text bears no support at this point. This tension tells us that the narratives’ themes are obedience (following instructions to the letter) and sacrifice( the boy putting the rescue of the trapped kids on the tree ahead of his healing).

    • Rhode Montijo’s “T-t-t-tartamundo” tells the story of a grandmother who is seeking a cure for her grandson’s speech problem. This is very clear to the reader without looking at any of the illustrations. Without the visual narratives the reader is only half of a story. With the textual narrative alone the story is simply of a boy who follows a specific path to find a cicada that will stop his stuttering however at the end of the textual narrative the reader does not know if it has worked. If we now only focus on the visual narratives we see a boy going into the forest to find something that will stop him from being ridiculed but we are unaware of what that is. The boy climbs up a tree to find other children in cages that we can infer from the following visuals are from the witch capturing them. We see the boy rescues all of the children before the witch gets back but seemingly does not obtain the cicada. It is only when put together we see a complete fluid story. We see a boy going into a forest to cure his stutter, following specific instructions but upon finding the cure he sees other children in cages and rescues them but does not seem to manage to acquire the cure. Both the visual narrative and textual narrative are important to this story as they both add different information at any given time to give the reader a clearer understanding of what is happening in the story.

    • arturo:

      Rhode Montijo’s “T-t-t-tartamudo” contains a tension between the visual and textual narrative, this tension evokes an emotion once finishing the story due to the different things that occur in the text and in the images. The text contains instruction given by the boatman on how to meet the elder, and then instructions provided by the elder to obtain a cure for the boy’s stuttering problem. However, the images don’t coincide with the text provided once the boy begins to climb the tree because the boy notices children who can be assumed to have been captured by the “hag” when attempting to obtain the tinder box, and he rescues them instead of getting the cicada that would have provided him with the cure for his stutter. This tension gives us an idea about the story’s theme being a theme in which the boy is a hero; he demonstrates his selfishness by sacrificing himself in a way in order to save those who have been caged up by the “hag.” The manner in which the text continues to provide instructions even though the child is not following it, establishes this tension thus enhancing the boy’s heroic act. The text ends with the elder having said, “place the cicada carefully under your boys tongue and this will stop his stuttering,” however the following two images show the boy asking the children “I-s-s-s-s e-e-e-e-verybody o-o-okay?” and then the box on top of the tree, untouched by the boy in order to get the children to safety. It is the ultimate depiction of selfishness, contributing to the heroic theme the story has.

  • ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY
    REVIEW SHEET
     

    CHECKLIST

    Entries are listed in alphabetical order by author’s last name.
    Entries are in MLA bibliographic format.
    Entries are sources that you discovered in an a […]

  • Here’s what you need to bring to class tomorrow:

    1) a draft of an annotation for one of your scholarly sources.

    2) the bibliographic information for all seven sources that you plan to use for the final assignment.

    For the those who lost the assignment sheet, click the below link:

    130 Paper 3 Topic

  • Review by: David Peck
    The Radical Teacher, No. 59, REVIEW ISSUE: AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES AT Y2K (Fall 2000), p. 41
    Published by: University of Illinois Press

    This review interprets the novel by stating the potential audiences of college and high school students. It gives a brief summary that does not share too much of the plot. It then…[Read more]

  • Review by: David Peck
    The Radical Teacher, No. 59, REVIEW ISSUE: AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES AT Y2K (Fall 2000), p. 41
    Published by: University of Illinois Press

    This review interprets the novel by stating the potential audiences of college and high school students. It gives a brief summary that does not share too much of the plot. It then…[Read more]

  • For this week’s blog entry, write a short response to the two reviews of Under of the Feet of Jesus that you read.  Note any particular interpretations, historical contexts, or issues that the reviewer mentioned.  If there is an idea that you found noteworthy, you might try to connect it to a part of the novel that the reviewer doesn’t discuss. Also mention the newspaper, magazine, or journal in which you found your review.

    These are short responses of 100 to 200 words.  Post your response as a comment to this entry.

    • The Radical Teacher, No. 59, REVIEW ISSUE: AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES AT Y2K (Fall 2000), p. 41
      This review gives a summary of the story as well as key themes relating to it. The title “Under the feet of Jesus” is seen as symbolic of religious iconography in which Jesus has the serpent under his feet. This serpent is seen as the Devil, so it shows how Jesus, or the good in the world, overcomes adversity or evil and flourishes. The story is about just this- a hard life and what Estrella does to make this life better for herself, and also for her family.

      Review by: John J. Hassett
      Chasqui, Vol. 25, No. 2 (Nov., 1996), pp. 147-148
      This review, unlike the previous one details the literary style Viramontes implements throughout the story in order to make a book that is both symbolic and meaningful. The way in which Viramontes utilizes simile and metaphor in order to cast different characters in different lights is commended. The story provides a personal experience of this one family, but shows a larger issue that needs to be addressed and the many migrant workers that deal with the harshness of life.

    • Review by: David Peck
      The Radical Teacher, No. 59, REVIEW ISSUE: AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES AT Y2K (Fall 2000), p. 41
      Published by: University of Illinois Press

      This review interprets the novel by stating the potential audiences of college and high school students. It gives a brief summary that does not share too much of the plot. It then compares it to other works of literature based on shared themes, such as: coming of age, immigration, and migrant labor. The review explains that the novel takes a turn when Alejo is sprayed by pesticides which ties to the theme of ecocrtitcism. It also explains that the character Estrella is a perfect example of bildingsroman because she gains the strength to hold her family together from her experiences.

      Review by: John J. Hassett
      Chasqui, Vol. 25, No. 2 (Nov., 1996), pp. 147-148
      Published by: Chasqui: revista de literatura latinoamericana

      This review starts off by discussing the work of another author, and saying how unstructured, loose, and exaggerated it is. Then it goes on to say that “Under the Feet of Jesus” isn’t any of those things, and it is well written. Hassett discusses the plot briefly along with setting. He describes the scenery as beautiful, and he also states that some people are living in poverty without certain rights and it might not be so lavish as we would expect. He goes on to say that Estrella does not to become a stereotypical migrant worker, and he ends by comparing the title with Estrella herself.

    • Review by: David Peck
      The Radical Teacher, No. 59, REVIEW ISSUE: AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES AT Y2K (Fall 2000), p. 41
      Published by: University of Illinois Press

      This review interprets the novel by stating the potential audiences of college and high school students. It gives a brief summary that does not share too much of the plot. It then compares it to other works of literature based on shared themes, such as: coming of age, immigration, and migrant labor. The review explains that the novel takes a turn when Alejo is sprayed by pesticides which ties to the theme of ecocrtitcism. It also explains that the character Estrella is a perfect example of bildingsroman because she gains the strength to hold her family together from her experiences.

      Review by: John J. Hassett
      Chasqui, Vol. 25, No. 2 (Nov., 1996), pp. 147-148
      Published by: Chasqui: revista de literatura latinoamericana

      This review starts off by discussing the work of another author, and saying how unstructured, loose, and exaggerated it is. Then it goes on to say that “Under the Feet of Jesus” isn’t any of those things, and it is well written. Hassett discusses the plot briefly along with setting. He describes the scenery as beautiful, and he also states that some people are living in poverty without certain rights and it might not be so lavish as we would expect. He goes on to say that Estrella does not to become a stereotypical migrant worker, and he ends by comparing the title with Estrella herself.

      Shanaz K.

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